• New Mexico History Museum | Sep 5, 2012

    Tall Tales of the Wild West: The Stories of Karl May

    Mention “Winnetou” or “Old Shatterhand” almost anywhere in Europe, and you’ll be met with smiles. But try it in the United States, and you’re more likely to earn a blank stare. Created by German author Karl May, Winnetou and Old Shatterhand are two of the most popular fictional characters of the 19th and 20th century. In a series of novels, they served as trail guides to the mystique of the American West and even today are celebrated in European festivals and theme parks.

    May’s books have outsold those of Louis L’Amour and Zane Grey combined and were beloved by the likes of Albert Einstein, Herman Hesse, Fritz Lang, and Franz Kafka. All of that makes the author (who died in 1912) something of an authority on cowboys, Indians, Rocky Mountains, saloon girls, soldiers, and banks ripe for robbing.

    But there’s a hitch: May never saw the West. Nevertheless, his faith in the glory of the West and his ability to nurture an entire continent’s love for it has drawn countless people across the Atlantic to visit and to stay. From Nov. 18, 2012, to Feb. 9, 2014, the New Mexico History Museum celebrates May’s life, legacy and lasting impact in Tall Tales of the Wild West: The Stories of Karl May.

  • Museum of New Mexico | Aug 30, 2012

    Deputy Cabinet Secretary Named at Cultural Affairs

    Michael Scott Delello has been named Deputy Cabinet Secretary of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. Delello is a former presidential appointee who held positions of Congressional Liaison, Special Assistant and Advisor under George H.W. Bush (Sr.). He will start his new position at Cultural Affairs on September 4. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science from Louisiana State University and has a diverse professional background in congressional and governmental affairs, constituent services, policy, international relations, and non-profit and business management. 

    “Michael brings a very high level of expertise and skill to the day-to-day management and operations of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs.” DCA Secretary Veronica Gonzales said. “He has a keen interest in New Mexico and deep appreciation for our diverse cultural resources.”

    Michael Scott Delello has been named Deputy Cabinet Secretary of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. Delello is a former presidential appointee who held positions of Congressional Liaison, Special Assistant and Advisor under George H.W. Bush (Sr.). He will start his new position at Cultural Affairs on September 4. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science from Louisiana State University and has a diverse professional background in congressional and governmental affairs, constituent services, policy, international relations, and non-profit and business management.  “Michael brings a very high level of expertise and skill to the day-to-day management and operations of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs.” DCA Secretary Veronica Gonzales said. “He has a keen interest in New Mexico and deep appreciation for our diverse cultural resources.”

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  • New Mexico History Museum | Aug 21, 2012

    7th Annual Palace Gem & Mineral Show

    Volcanoes, earthquakes, water, wind, and ice created the raw materials that adorn our favorite pieces of jewelry. See and purchase a worldwide variety of the authentic versions of stones, fossils and gems at the 7th annual Palace Gem & Mineral Show, Sept. 28-30, in the Palace Courtyard. New this year: Jewelry-making and mineral-painting workshops join the daily al fresco lectures on a variety of topics.

    Enter for free through the Blue Gate on Lincoln Avenue and meet the miners, traders and jewelers whose stories of how the forces of nature formed geodes, fossils, and turquoise will deepen your appreciation for the treasures beneath our feet. The event is open 10 am to 7 pm on Friday, Sept. 28; and 9 am to 4:30 pm on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 29-30.

     

  • New Mexico History Museum | Aug 20, 2012

    State Historian to Deliver the Santa Fe Fiesta Lecture

    Diego de Vargas’s 1693 reconquest of Santa Fe did not create the peaceful Spanish province he needed for successful governance. To get it, he employed a series of strategies, including compadrazgo (godparenthood) of tribal children, divide-and-conquer, and a sweet helping of chocolate diplomacy.

    State Historian Rick Hendricks will detail what Vargas did and how it worked in ”I Was Godfather to Them: Diego de Vargas and the Reconquest of New Mexico,” the annual Santa Fe Fiesta Lecture at the New Mexico History Museum at 6 pm on Wednesday, Sept. 5. The lecture is sponsored by the Palace Guard, and admission is free to its members; $5 others, at the door. Seating is limited.

  • Museum of Indian Arts and Culture | Jul 29, 2012

    Woven Identities

    For the first time in over 30 years, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture opens a major exhibition of North American Indian baskets on Sunday, November 20, 2011. The exhibition runs through February 23, 2014.

  • New Mexico Museum of Art | Jul 26, 2012

    New World: Timeless Visions

    The New Mexico Museum of Art will host New World: Timeless Visions, the biennial membership exhibition of the International Academy of Ceramics (IAC). The exhibition coincides with the IAC’s biennial General Assembly, which is being held this year in Santa Fe. The exhibition will be on view September 7-23, 2012.

  • Museum of Indian Arts and Culture | Jun 18, 2012

    Summer of Baskets: Demonstrations and Workshops

    In conjunction with the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture’s exhibition Woven Identities: Basketry Art from the Collections a series of basketry programming is offered over the course of three weekends this summer; June 23 and 24, July 7 and 8, and August 4 and 5.

    Workshops run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the MIAC classroom, with an hour break for lunch. Lunch is not provided, please plan to bring your own lunch or purchase one from Museum Hill Café during the break. Cost is $25 per person or $15 for youth and students (ages 10 and over). Space is limited and preregistration is required.  Please call 505-982-5057 for tickets or purchase in person at the MIAC gift shop. The public may call 505-476-1271 for more information.

     Demonstrations are free with museum admission. Museum admission for Sunday demonstrations is FREE to New Mexico residents and children under 17.

  • Museum of International Folk Art | Jun 12, 2012

    The Art of Gaman

    The Art of Gaman reflects the strength of Japanese American character in the face of humiliating internment through nearly 100 objects created during World War II. The exhibition opens at the Museum of International Folk Art July 8, 2012 and runs through October 7, 2012.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Jun 12, 2012

    Pinhole Photography Collection Joins the New Mexico History Museum

    Mysterious, artistic, and as low-tech as an oatmeal box, pinhole photography has captivated everyone from schoolchildren to professional photographers for more than a century. The Pinhole Resource Archives, the world’s largest collection of images, books and cameras, just joined New Mexico’s largest archive of photography, the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives at the New Mexico History Museum.

    The collection was a donation from Pinhole Resource Inc., which is based in New Mexico and led by Eric Renner and Nancy Spencer. Already in the works is a 2014 exhibition, Poetics and Light, celebrating works from the collection.

  • Museum of New Mexico | May 22, 2012

    A Gift to Military Families from NM Museums & Monuments

    As part of the national Blue Star Museums Program, New Mexico’s 14 state-run museums and historic monuments will once again offer free admission to active duty military personnel and their families during the summer months.

    “This is a gesture of appreciation for the service and dedication of the men and women of our military,” said Governor Susana Martinez. “When New Mexicans put on our country’s uniform to defend our freedom, they make a tremendous sacrifice—and so do their families. I hope that all active-duty military members in New Mexico, as well as their families, will enjoy some of our finest cultural treasures this summer.”

    The National Endowment for the Arts created the Blue Star Museums program in 2010 to honor active-duty military members and their families.  More than 1,500 museums across America have signed up for the program this summer. The free admission will be available from Memorial Day, May 28, through Labor Day, September 3.

  • New Mexico History Museum | May 15, 2012

    "Native American Portraits" Opening Reception

    Santa Fe—A dazzling collection of original prints featuring Native Americans from across North America opens this Friday at the New Mexico History Museum. The Women’s Board of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation will serve refreshments from 5-7 pm. The museum is open for free on Fridays from 5-8 pm.

    Native American Portraits: Points of Inquiry pulls some of the most beautiful and elegant portraits from the collections of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives. Dating back to the Civil War, the images reveal photographers’ attempts to portray the lives of Native American peoples. Almost inadvertently, the photographs also portray a nation’s changing attitudes toward Native peoples.

  • New Mexico Museum of Art | May 8, 2012

    Treasures Seldom Seen

    Treasures Seldom Seen rejoices in the representational paintings from the New Mexico Museum of Art collection that defined mainstream New Mexico Art almost a century ago. Landscapes by George Bellows, John Sloan, and Fremont Ellis, as well as portraits by Paul Berlin, Oscar Berninghaus, Victor Higgins, and Joseph Henry Sharp are featured. In addition, an alcove presents works by, and about, Georgia O’Keeffe and another introduces the museum’s Web site New Mexico Art Tells New Mexico History.

  • New Mexico Museum of Art | May 8, 2012

    The Curve: Center Award Winners, 2012

    The New Mexico Museum of Art partners again this year exhibiting the winners of CENTER’s  annual Project Competition and Project Launch. The exhibition opens May 25 and runs through August 26, 2012.

    First place winners are Anastasia Taylor-Lind in the Project Competition for her series The National Womb, and Odette England in the Project Launch for her series Thrice Upon a Time.

  • New Mexico Museum of Art | May 2, 2012

    Alcove Show 12.2

    (SANTA FE, NM  MAY 2, 2012)—Alcove 12.2, the second in a series of nine Alcove Shows highlighting artists working in New Mexico today, opens on Friday, May 4, 2012 at the New Mexico Museum of Art.  Each Alcove show will last five weeks and feature five New Mexico artists at various career stages. Over-all, forty-five artists working in all media will be on view until the cycle of exhibitions ends April 2013.

     The artists exhibiting in Alcove 12.2 are:  Robert Ellis, Steve Fitch, Harmony Hammond, August Muth and Terri Rolland. 

  • New Mexico History Museum | Apr 24, 2012

    The Segesser Hide Paintings: Examine an 18th-century artifact with 21st-century tools

    In the early 1700s, Spain’s northern colony sat at the edge of a frontier that could be fraught with danger. Inside the Palace of the Governors at the New Mexico History Museum, visitors can see examples of what happened when explorers set out on that frontier. The Segesser Hide Paintings depict two such adventures on a grand scale—a total of roughly 137 square feet of what is likely bison leather painted with natural pigments.

    “The Segesser hides are a rare and important artifact of our collection, not only because of what they show but because of what they are,” said Dr. Frances Levine, director of the New Mexico History Museum. “The expeditions depicted on the Segesser hides likely began at the front door of the Palace of the Governors, so we like to think that the hides truly came home to us.”

    In the early 1700s, Spain’s northern colony sat at the edge of a frontier that could be fraught with danger. Inside the Palace of the Governors at the New Mexico History Museum, visitors can see examples of what happened when explorers set out on that frontier. The Segesser Hide Paintings depict two such adventures on a grand scale—a total of roughly 137 square feet of what is likely bison leather painted with natural pigments. “The Segesser hides are a rare and important artifact of our collection, not only because of what they show but because of what they are,” said Dr. Frances Levine, director of the New Mexico History Museum. “The expeditions depicted on the Segesser hides likely began at the front door of the Palace of the Governors, so we like to think that the hides truly came home to us.”

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  • New Mexico Museum of Art | Apr 11, 2012

    Repeat After Me

    The New Mexico Museum of Art exhibition Repeat After Me assembles more than twenty contemporary prints that make use of repetition—as process and as image. A print, by definition, is a reproducible image: multiple prints can be made from a single plate. Repetition is seen also in these prints as visual motifs such as a line, a figure, or a geometric form such as a square, flower, or circle.

  • New Mexico Museum of Art | Apr 6, 2012

    Waterscapes: Photographs from the Collection

    (Santa Fe, NM)—Water, its scarcity or abundance and our relation to this substance which sustains life, is the theme of this photography exhibition. Waterscapes follows on last year’s exhibition of cloud photographs, both drawn from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s permanent collection by Curator of Photography Katherine Ware. The exhibition remains open through August 26, 2012.

    The selection of more than thirty photographs showcases the museum’s strong holding of work by mid-century masters such as Ansel Adams, Harry Callahan, Laura Gilpin, Lisette Model, Eliot Porter, and Brett Weston as well as contemporary artists including Renate Aller, Debra Bloomfield, Wanda Hammerbeck, John Pfahl, and Edward Ranney.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Apr 5, 2012

    The Saint Johnís Bible and Contemplative Landscape

    Thirteen years of painstaking work by some of the finest calligraphers, artists and theologians in the world comes to a close this year with the completion of The Saint John’s Bible – a contemporary handwritten and illuminated Bible created by a team of artists and calligraphers at a Scriptorium in Wales. Before its pages are bound into volumes and placed on permanent exhibition by the Benedictine monks at Saint John’s Abbey and University in Collegeville, Minn., 44 pages from two of the Bible’s seven volumes – Wisdom Books and Prophets – will be exhibited at the New Mexico History Museum.

    Illuminating the Word: The Saint John’s Bible (Oct. 23 through Dec. 30, 2012) will share its space and spirit with Contemplative Landscape (Oct. 23 through Dec. 30, 2012), a photographic exploration of how people have responded to and interacted with New Mexico’s landscape through art, architecture and sacred rituals. The exhibition prominently features the work of Tony O’Brien, whose 1994-95 sojourn at a New Mexico monastery forms the heart of his new book, Light in the Desert: Photographs from the Monastery of Christ in the Desert  (Museum of New Mexico Press), debuting with the exhibition.

    Thirteen years of painstaking work by some of the finest calligraphers, artists and theologians in the world comes to a close this year with the completion of The Saint John’s Bible – a contemporary handwritten and illuminated Bible created by a team of artists and calligraphers at a Scriptorium in Wales. Before its pages are bound into volumes and placed on permanent exhibition by the Benedictine monks at Saint John’s Abbey and University in Collegeville, Minn., 44 pages from two of the Bible’s seven volumes – Wisdom Books and Prophets – will be exhibited at the New Mexico History Museum. Illuminating the Word: The Saint John’s Bible (Oct. 23 through Dec. 30, 2012) will share its space and spirit with Contemplative Landscape (Oct. 23 through Dec. 30, 2012), a photographic exploration of how people have responded to and interacted with New Mexico’s landscape through art, architecture and sacred rituals. The exhibition prominently features the work of Tony O’Brien, whose 1994-95 sojourn at a New Mexico monastery forms the heart of his new book, Light in the Desert: Photographs from the Monastery of Christ in the Desert  (Museum of New Mexico Press), debuting with the exhibition.

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  • New Mexico History Museum | Mar 20, 2012

    Learn Santa Fe History on Foot: Downtown Walking Tours Resume in April

    Ever noticed the recycled rifle barrels in a certain window of the Palace of the Governors? Wondered where the Manhattan Project scientists learned of their new posting? Picked out the Victorian architecture from the Pueblo Revival on the Santa Fe Plaza?

    Learn those facts and more by taking a Downtown Walking Tour led by New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors guides. The tours resume on April 16 (through mid-October), Monday-Saturday, beginning at 10:15 a.m. Gather at the Palace Courtyard’s Blue Gate just south of the History Museum entrance at 113 Lincoln Ave. Cost is $10. Children 16 and under are free when accompanied by an adult. Museum guides do not accept tips.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Mar 12, 2012

    New exhibit explores changing views of Native peoples through photography

    Since the Civil War, photographers have tried to capture the lives of Native American peoples, resulting in some of the most beautiful and elegant portraits in the collections of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives. More than 50 of these images will be on display from May 18 to November 4, 2012, in Native American Portraits: Points of Inquiry, a salon-style exhibition in the History Museum’s Mezzanine Gallery. Along with a selection of contemporary photographs, the images document the changing perceptions of Native peoples over a span of 150 years.

  • New Mexico History Museum | Feb 22, 2012

    Good News: St. Johnís Bible Earns an Extended Engagement

    The popularity of Illuminating the Word: The Saint John’s Bible, combined with the delighted approval of the exhibition’s design from the monks of Saint John’s University, has led to an extension of the show’s run. Previously set to close on April 7, The Saint John’s Bible will now be on exhibit in the History Museum’s Herzstein Gallery until December 30, 2012.

    “The installation of the folios in the New Mexico History Museum presents The Saint John’s Bible in one of the most beautiful and faith-filled exhibitions of this Bible done to date,” said Tim Ternes, director of The Saint John’s Bible. “The contemplative environment artfully shares the story, work and process of this monumental project in a setting that compels the guest to slow down, relax and reflect. Saint John’s is very pleased to be able to extend this exhibition in the Santa Fe area, a place where art, faith and culture have been harmoniously blended for centuries.”

    The popularity of Illuminating the Word: The Saint John’s Bible, combined with the delighted approval of the exhibition’s design from the monks of Saint John’s University, has led to an extension of the show’s run. Previously set to close on April 7, The Saint John’s Bible will now be on exhibit in the History Museum’s Herzstein Gallery until December 30, 2012. “The installation of the folios in the New Mexico History Museum presents The Saint John’s Bible in one of the most beautiful and faith-filled exhibitions of this Bible done to date,” said Tim Ternes, director of The Saint John’s Bible. “The contemplative environment artfully shares the story, work and process of this monumental project in a setting that compels the guest to slow down, relax and reflect. Saint John’s is very pleased to be able to extend this exhibition in the Santa Fe area, a place where art, faith and culture have been harmoniously blended for centuries.”

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  • New Mexico History Museum | Feb 21, 2012

    The Statehood History Conference

    Outlaws, Rough Riders, classic restaurants and a possible spy will come to life at the 2012 New Mexico Statehood History Conference, May 3-5, in Santa Fe. Presented by the Historical Society of New Mexico and the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors, this Centennial version of the Society’s annual conference includes a special treat: A daylong free symposium, open to the public, plus free admission to the History Museum on May 3. The conference, May 4 and 5 at the Santa Fe Convention and Visitors Center, is held in collaboration with the New Mexico Heritage Preservation Alliance, which is having its annual conference at La Posada that weekend. Details, including special hotel rates and how to register for all or part of the Statehood History Conference, are at the Historical Society’s web site: http://www.hsnm.org/2012%20Items/home__2012_conference.htm.

  • Coronado Historic Site | Feb 19, 2012

    Los Ciboleros - Spanish Buffalo Hunters

    Coronado State Monument, Bernalillo

    Manuel Lopez, a noted historical interpreter, will discuss the hunting methods and stories of the Ciboleros, the Spanish buffalo hunters of the 1700-1800s who hunted on the open plains of the American Southwest for meat and hides. The event takes place on Sunday, February 19, from 2 to 4 p.m.

    Manuel Lopez has a B.A. from the University of New Mexico, and has been a member and board member of the Association of Living History Farms and Agricultural Museums (ALHFAM).  A seasoned presenter, he has participated in numerous events and made presentations at Bents Fort, El Camino Real International Heritage Center, the Pioneers Museum in Colorado Springs, El Pueblo Museum in Pueblo Colorado and the Palace of the Governors in Santa Fe.   He has worked with El Rancho de Las Golondrinas (living history ranch) in La Cienega for nearly 20 years.

    Lecture $5/adult, free to Members of the Friends of Coronado State Monument.

    Event will be held at The DeLavy House (Sandoval County Historical Society), 161 Edmond Rd, Bernalillo, NM.  Located off Hwy 550, 1.7 miles west of I-25, Exit 242 (Just west of Coronado State Monument; turn north on the gravel road between the Phillips 66 Station and the new IHOP Restaurant).

    For info: 505-867-5351, www.nmmonuments.org, http://home.comcast.net/~friendsofcsm

     

    Coronado State Monument, Bernalillo Manuel Lopez, a noted historical interpreter, will discuss the hunting methods and stories of the Ciboleros, the Spanish buffalo hunters of the 1700-1800s who hunted on the open plains of the American Southwest for meat and hides. The event takes place on Sunday, February 19, from 2 to 4 p.m.Manuel Lopez has a B.A. from the University of New Mexico, and has been a member and board member of the Association of Living History Farms and Agricultural Museums (ALHFAM).  A seasoned presenter, he has participated in numerous events and made presentations at Bents Fort, El Camino Real International Heritage Center, the Pioneers Museum in Colorado Springs, El Pueblo Museum in Pueblo Colorado and the Palace of the Governors in Santa Fe.   He has worked with El Rancho de Las Golondrinas (living history ranch) in La Cienega for nearly 20 years. Lecture $5/adult, free to Members of the Friends of Coronado State Monument. Event will be held at The DeLavy House (Sandoval County Historical Society), 161 Edmond Rd, Bernalillo, NM.  Located off Hwy 550, 1.7 miles west of I-25, Exit 242 (Just west of Coronado State Monument; turn north on the gravel road between the Phillips 66 Station and the new IHOP Restaurant).For info: 505-867-5351, www.nmmonuments.org, http://home.comcast.net/~friendsofcsm  

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  • New Mexico Museum of Art | Feb 17, 2012

    Taming the Wild West: The Arts in New Mexicoís Journey to Statehood

    On Friday, February 17, 2012 at 5:30 p.m. the New Mexico Museum of Art will present the second in a series of monthly presentations on the New Mexico Centennial.

    In the 19th century New Mexico was famous for its colorful and often violent frontier life. Last month three evocative storytellers, MARK LEE GARDNER, PAUL HUTTON, and HAMPTON SIDES, discussed some of the legends who defined it, among them Kit Carson, Billy the Kid, and Pat Garrett.

    We now focus on the period from the 1880s to the 1920s, when civic leaders sought to prove that territorial New Mexico was ready for statehood. One strategy was to adopt building styles and other fashions that were popular in the rest of the nation. Another, which soon became dominant in Santa Fe, was to draw upon Native and Hispanic traditions and emphasize features that made our region unique.

    To explore the role that architecture, painting, pottery, weaving, and other arts played in this key transition, we’ll call on anthropologist NANCY OWEN LEWIS, a Research Associate and former Director of Scholar Programs at the School for Advanced Research, an institution that is pivotal to this narrative. Lewis co-authored A PECULIAR ALCHEMY, a history of SAR that traces Edgar Lee Hewett’s impact on Southwest culture. Joining her will be New Mexico Museum of Art curator JOSEPH TRAUGOTT, who has given us HOW THE WEST IS ONE, SOLE MATES, and other delightful exhibitions. Presiding over the gathering will be JOHN F. ANDREWS, of the New Mexico Humanities Council who hosts a popular Speaking of Shakespeare series in Manhattan.

    FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, AT 5:30 P.M.ADMISSION $15 Reserve online at www.TicketsSantaFe.org, call (505) 988-1234, or pay at the door.

    SPONSORED BY THE NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART 107 West Palace Avenue (505) 476-5071

  • New Mexico History Museum | Feb 13, 2012

    Encore: Schola Cantorum and the Monks of Christ in the Desert Monastery

    Last December, a performance by Santa Fe’s Schola Cantorum and the monks of Christ in the Desert Monastery drew an overflow crowd to the New Mexico History Museum. So many people were turned away that the singers graciously offered an impromptu, after-show performance in the museum lobby. Impressed by the turnout, as well as the unexpectedly fine acoustics of the lobby, the singers eagerly offered to return for an encore performance.

    At 2 pm on Sunday, March 11, come to the museum lobby for a soulful afternoon featuring Holy Week chants of 10th-century Europe, polyphony of the 16th-century Renaissance and, in honor of St. Patrick’s Day, chants from Ireland’s Dublin Troper, published in 1360. The event is free with admission; Sundays free to NM residents.

  • Museum of Indian Arts and Culture | Feb 6, 2012

    They Wove for Horses: Dinť Saddle Blankets

    They Wove for Horses: Diné Saddle Blankets opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on March 25, 2012 and runs through August 8, 2013.. The exhibition highlights both the textile-weaving proficiency of Diné weavers who produced complex saddle blankets for all occasions and the design skills of Diné silversmiths who created dazzling headstalls of silver and turquoise.

  • El Palacio Magazine | Jan 26, 2012

    El Palacio Magazine, Centennial Gift to New Mexico

    El Palacio Magazine, published by the Museum of New Mexico for nearly 100 years, celebrates the digital age just as the state celebrates its centennial, by putting the first ten years of the magazine online, free to all at http://archives.elpalacio.org.

  • Museum of New Mexico | Jan 23, 2012

    American Association of Museums Grants State System Highest Accreditation Status

    The Museum of New Mexico has been re-accredited by the American Association of Museums and granted its highest award. The announcement was made today at the Department of Cultural Affairs’ annual Culture Day in the Capitol Rotunda by Bonnie Styles, chair of AAM’s Accreditation Commission and director of the Illinois State Museum. 

     

    This national accreditation applies to the State Of New Mexico’s Museum system, comprised of 14 state-operated entities under the DCA: the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors; Museum of International Folk Art; New Mexico Museum of Art; Museum of Indian Arts & Culture; Museum Resources Division; Office of Archaeological Studies; and the Coronado, Ft. Selden, Jemez, Lincoln, El Camino Real, Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner, Fort Stanton, and the Taylor-Barela-Reynolds-Mesilla state monuments.

    The Museum of New Mexico has been re-accredited by the American Association of Museums and granted its highest award. The announcement was made today at the Department of Cultural Affairs’ annual Culture Day in the Capitol Rotunda by Bonnie Styles, chair of AAM’s Accreditation Commission and director of the Illinois State Museum.    This national accreditation applies to the State Of New Mexico’s Museum system, comprised of 14 state-operated entities under the DCA: the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors; Museum of International Folk Art; New Mexico Museum of Art; Museum of Indian Arts & Culture; Museum Resources Division; Office of Archaeological Studies; and the Coronado, Ft. Selden, Jemez, Lincoln, El Camino Real, Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner, Fort Stanton, and the Taylor-Barela-Reynolds-Mesilla state monuments.

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  • Museum of New Mexico | Jan 20, 2012

    Culture Day at the Capitol

    Media Advisory

    Monday, January 23

    Culture Day at the Capitol, 8 am to 5 pm

    Special presentation at noon in the Rotunda, featuring an important announcement by the American Association of Museums regarding the status of the Museum of New Mexico’s accreditation.

    Photo opps include:

    ·        Performances at the noon event by dancer Regina Bell Dawley, singer/songwriter Cathy McGill, and the 3-HC Holy Faith Break Dancers.

    ·        Displays throughout the day from museums, monuments and other DCA programs, sure to include dinosaurs, rockets, folk art, archaeology and more

    ·        Visitors posing themselves into a cutout of a Centennial parade car for souvenir photos

    Possible interviews: DCA Secretary Veronica Gonzales; Bonnie Styles, chair of AAM’s Accreditation Commission and director of the Illinois State Museum

    Media Advisory Monday, January 23 Culture Day at the Capitol, 8 am to 5 pmSpecial presentation at noon in the Rotunda, featuring an important announcement by the American Association of Museums regarding the status of the Museum of New Mexico’s accreditation. Photo opps include: ·        Performances at the noon event by dancer Regina Bell Dawley, singer/songwriter Cathy McGill, and the 3-HC Holy Faith Break Dancers. ·        Displays throughout the day from museums, monuments and other DCA programs, sure to include dinosaurs, rockets, folk art, archaeology and more ·        Visitors posing themselves into a cutout of a Centennial parade car for souvenir photos Possible interviews: DCA Secretary Veronica Gonzales; Bonnie Styles, chair of AAM’s Accreditation Commission and director of the Illinois State Museum

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  • New Mexico Historic Sites | Jan 9, 2012

    Visit New Mexico’s State Monuments in 2012

    During this New Mexico Centennial year visit the state's most valued cultural treasures - its monuments. They provide ample opportunity and enticement to travel the state, see historic sites, and experience true New Mexico culture. Enjoy!

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