here.

How they came to be at the Palace of the Governors is a tale as circuitous as it was fortuitous. The hides found their way back to the Southwest—and eventually to the Palace—more than 200 years after Philipp von Segesser von Brunegg, a Jesuit priest, sent them to his family in Switzerland in 1758. It is believed that he acquired them in Sonora, Mexico, between 1732 and 1758, from the Anzas, a family that was prominent in military and civil affairs in both New Mexico and the Sonoran village where Father Segesser’s mission was situated.

The existence of the hide paintings had long had been known, but their availability came to light in 1983 when another museum wanted to borrow them, only to discover that the von Segesser who then owned them wanted to sell rather than lend. Enter the interest of the Palace of the Governors, which purchased in 1988 the hide paintings designated Segesser I and Segesser II.

Segesser I and II were painted on hides, likely bison, that had been tanned to make them supple, pumiced so that the grain was no longer visible, and sewn together to form a large canvas. The hides do not exhibit any distinctive ground or gesso layer under the paint.

Some scholars believe that the Segesser Hide Paintings were created in New Mexico, where imported canvas was rare and processed hides were used for a variety of purposes, including paintings on hide, or reposteros, that were exported to Mexico. There is documentary evidence that hides were painted in workshops in Santa Fe. Because the Segesser renderings include several distinct styles, some scholars suggest that as many as three artists painted specific elements of the overall rendering. We believe that the artists were indigenous New Mexicans with tribal affiliation who had the benefit of eyewitness descriptions and were taught European painting techniques. Yet the Segesser paintings were not rendered in a traditional European style typical of military paintings of that era; rather they are more characteristic of indigenous or folk-art paintings.

The late 17th and early 18th centuries were the final great period of European battle tapestries. Such textiles, imported to the Americas, might have influenced the commissioned Segesser hides. The hides contain wide, broadly painted flower and leaf borders that simulate carved or gilded frames, which also was typical of European tapestries from the same era.

Segesser I

This set of hides represents an encounter between rival tribesmen, the attacking side possibly accompanied by a Spanish leader. Scholars agree that the painting’s features, including hills, cliffs, deciduous trees, bison, deer and pumas, indicate that this encounter took place over varied terrain.

Who took part in the conflict and where and when it occurred remains the subject of scholarly debate. Basing their theories on historical records and the painting’s account of the event, some scholars suggest that Segesser I portrays one or more Spanish officers with Indian allies—possibly the Manso, Opata, Tlascalan, Tarascan, Pima and a faction of the Suma—who are attacking rival Sumas or Apaches, in the El Paso, Texas region.

Others say that the painters were unfamiliar with both the encounter and the cultures involved, and so substituted familiar individuals, animals and terrain in a painting that actually portrays Pueblo Indian auxiliaries attacking Plains Apache Indians. Such fighting took place in any one of a half-dozen expeditions launched between 1693 and 1719 from the Palace to the eastern plains to discourage raids by tribal factions.

Because the encounter has not been pinpointed, it is not known if the individuals behind the wooden palisade are members of the defending tribe or captive slaves taken from other tribes. The attackers on horseback are equipped with Spanish weapons, clothing and leather armor to distinguish them from the opposition.

There are pieces missing from the original rendering. Parts were separated from the work sometime before 1908 and given to a Segesser family member where they are today.

Segesser II

These hides depict a disastrous, 1720 rout of Spanish troops and their allies in present-day Nebraska.

Throughout the Spanish Colonial period, officials at the Palace of the Governors routinely dispatched troops to patrol and explore beyond the colonial boundaries. Hearing of encroachment by the French, New Mexico Governor Antonio Valverde y Cosio dispatched Spanish troops and Pueblo Indian auxiliaries to verify the rumors. Led by New Mexico Lieutenant Governor and Commander-in-chief Pedro de Villasur, the military expedition also was charged with locating a suitable site on the remote eastern plains for a Spanish military post, requested by the Spanish Viceroy in Mexico City.

The Villasur expedition headed north from Santa Fe to Taos, turned east, then northeast into present-day Kansas. They followed a Pawnee route to the Platte River, moving north into eastern Nebraska. Beyond the junction of the Platte and Loup rivers, they encountered a large Pawnee Indian encampment. Villasur initiated a dialogue and asked Juan de Archibeque (Jean l’Archévêque), a Frenchman and expedition interpreter, to write a letter in French to a European within the Pawnee camp. The efforts failed and sensing a potentially hostile situation, the expedition retreated and camped at the confluence of the Loup and Platte rivers.

The Segesser II painting can be pinpointed to the August 13, 1720, skirmish at the expedition camp. After daybreak, the Pawnee and their Oto Indian allies—illustrated throughout the painting by their painted and unclothed bodies and shaved or close-cropped heads—ambushed the Villasur party. The painting also includes 37 French soldiers, identified by their European-style clothing—conical hats, coats, breeches, cuffs and leggings—firing long arms at the Spanish military expedition.

Composed of 43 royal troops, three Spanish civilians, 60 Pueblo Indian auxiliaries and several other Indian allies, the Villasur expedition was caught off guard, and the pitched battle left many of them for dead in the tall prairie grass. The attack was a major catastrophe for New Mexico and casualties amounted to a third of the province’s best soldiers. The center of the painting portrays French soldiers with Pawnee and Oto supporters surrounding the camp. At the right of the painting, Villasur expedition members who were guarding the animals are shown running to assist their Spanish comrades.

Interestingly, oral and written accounts of the battle do not mention French soldiers in the area of the encounter. Several Villasur survivors reported a volley of musket fire, but in the confusion of the battle, they did not know who was attacking them. It is possible that French traders took part in the ambush. Governor Valverde y Cosio, perhaps in an effort to defend the actions of Villasur, reported “two hundred Frenchmen had fired, supported by a countless number of Pawnee allies.”

 

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

Though the source of the Segesser Hide Paintings is obscure, their significance cannot be clearer: the hides are rare examples of the earliest known depictions of colonial life in the United States. Moreover, the tanned and smoothed hides carry the very faces of men whose descendants live in New Mexico today. Perhaps both paintings illustrate military expeditions dispatched from the Palace of the Governors, when it was called las casas reales, the royal houses.

The hides are on display in the Palace of the Governors; a computer interactive offering more detailed information about the sections is next door at the New Mexico History Museum (on the same campus) and can also be found online here.

How they came to be at the Palace of the Governors is a tale as circuitous as it was fortuitous. The hides found their way back to the Southwest—and eventually to the Palace—more than 200 years after Philipp von Segesser von Brunegg, a Jesuit priest, sent them to his family in Switzerland in 1758. It is believed that he acquired them in Sonora, Mexico, between 1732 and 1758, from the Anzas, a family that was prominent in military and civil affairs in both New Mexico and the Sonoran village where Father Segesser’s mission was situated.

The existence of the hide paintings had long had been known, but their availability came to light in 1983 when another museum wanted to borrow them, only to discover that the von Segesser who then owned them wanted to sell rather than lend. Enter the interest of the Palace of the Governors, which purchased in 1988 the hide paintings designated Segesser I and Segesser II.

Segesser I and II were painted on hides, likely bison, that had been tanned to make them supple, pumiced so that the grain was no longer visible, and sewn together to form a large canvas. The hides do not exhibit any distinctive ground or gesso layer under the paint.

Some scholars believe that the Segesser Hide Paintings were created in New Mexico, where imported canvas was rare and processed hides were used for a variety of purposes, including paintings on hide, or reposteros, that were exported to Mexico. There is documentary evidence that hides were painted in workshops in Santa Fe. Because the Segesser renderings include several distinct styles, some scholars suggest that as many as three artists painted specific elements of the overall rendering. We believe that the artists were indigenous New Mexicans with tribal affiliation who had the benefit of eyewitness descriptions and were taught European painting techniques. Yet the Segesser paintings were not rendered in a traditional European style typical of military paintings of that era; rather they are more characteristic of indigenous or folk-art paintings.

The late 17th and early 18th centuries were the final great period of European battle tapestries. Such textiles, imported to the Americas, might have influenced the commissioned Segesser hides. The hides contain wide, broadly painted flower and leaf borders that simulate carved or gilded frames, which also was typical of European tapestries from the same era.

Segesser I

This set of hides represents an encounter between rival tribesmen, the attacking side possibly accompanied by a Spanish leader. Scholars agree that the painting’s features, including hills, cliffs, deciduous trees, bison, deer and pumas, indicate that this encounter took place over varied terrain.

Who took part in the conflict and where and when it occurred remains the subject of scholarly debate. Basing their theories on historical records and the painting’s account of the event, some scholars suggest that Segesser I portrays one or more Spanish officers with Indian allies—possibly the Manso, Opata, Tlascalan, Tarascan, Pima and a faction of the Suma—who are attacking rival Sumas or Apaches, in the El Paso, Texas region.

Others say that the painters were unfamiliar with both the encounter and the cultures involved, and so substituted familiar individuals, animals and terrain in a painting that actually portrays Pueblo Indian auxiliaries attacking Plains Apache Indians. Such fighting took place in any one of a half-dozen expeditions launched between 1693 and 1719 from the Palace to the eastern plains to discourage raids by tribal factions.

Because the encounter has not been pinpointed, it is not known if the individuals behind the wooden palisade are members of the defending tribe or captive slaves taken from other tribes. The attackers on horseback are equipped with Spanish weapons, clothing and leather armor to distinguish them from the opposition.

There are pieces missing from the original rendering. Parts were separated from the work sometime before 1908 and given to a Segesser family member where they are today.

Segesser II

These hides depict a disastrous, 1720 rout of Spanish troops and their allies in present-day Nebraska.

Throughout the Spanish Colonial period, officials at the Palace of the Governors routinely dispatched troops to patrol and explore beyond the colonial boundaries. Hearing of encroachment by the French, New Mexico Governor Antonio Valverde y Cosio dispatched Spanish troops and Pueblo Indian auxiliaries to verify the rumors. Led by New Mexico Lieutenant Governor and Commander-in-chief Pedro de Villasur, the military expedition also was charged with locating a suitable site on the remote eastern plains for a Spanish military post, requested by the Spanish Viceroy in Mexico City.

The Villasur expedition headed north from Santa Fe to Taos, turned east, then northeast into present-day Kansas. They followed a Pawnee route to the Platte River, moving north into eastern Nebraska. Beyond the junction of the Platte and Loup rivers, they encountered a large Pawnee Indian encampment. Villasur initiated a dialogue and asked Juan de Archibeque (Jean l’Archévêque), a Frenchman and expedition interpreter, to write a letter in French to a European within the Pawnee camp. The efforts failed and sensing a potentially hostile situation, the expedition retreated and camped at the confluence of the Loup and Platte rivers.

The Segesser II painting can be pinpointed to the August 13, 1720, skirmish at the expedition camp. After daybreak, the Pawnee and their Oto Indian allies—illustrated throughout the painting by their painted and unclothed bodies and shaved or close-cropped heads—ambushed the Villasur party. The painting also includes 37 French soldiers, identified by their European-style clothing—conical hats, coats, breeches, cuffs and leggings—firing long arms at the Spanish military expedition.

Composed of 43 royal troops, three Spanish civilians, 60 Pueblo Indian auxiliaries and several other Indian allies, the Villasur expedition was caught off guard, and the pitched battle left many of them for dead in the tall prairie grass. The attack was a major catastrophe for New Mexico and casualties amounted to a third of the province’s best soldiers. The center of the painting portrays French soldiers with Pawnee and Oto supporters surrounding the camp. At the right of the painting, Villasur expedition members who were guarding the animals are shown running to assist their Spanish comrades.

Interestingly, oral and written accounts of the battle do not mention French soldiers in the area of the encounter. Several Villasur survivors reported a volley of musket fire, but in the confusion of the battle, they did not know who was attacking them. It is possible that French traders took part in the ambush. Governor Valverde y Cosio, perhaps in an effort to defend the actions of Villasur, reported “two hundred Frenchmen had fired, supported by a countless number of Pawnee allies.”

 

 

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 37_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 37_thumb.jpg [8] => 2007-04-24 [eventStartDate] => 2007-04-24 [9] => 2030-04-24 [eventEndDate] => 2030-04-24 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 19 [instID] => 19 [15] => 72 [contactID] => 72 [16] => 2017-07-22 13:52:40 [eventUpdated] => 2017-07-22 13:52:40 [17] => 37_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 37_1200.jpg [18] => 19 [19] => New Mexico History Museum [instName] => New Mexico History Museum [20] => 19.jpg [instFileName] => 19.jpg [urlSlug] => segesser-hide-painti ) [3] => Array ( [0] => 31 [eventID] => 31 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción [eventTitle] => Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos dating from the late 1700s to 1900 which illustrate the distinctive tradition of santo making in New Mexico introduced by settlers from Mexico.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos dating from the late 1700s to 1900 which illustrate the distinctive tradition of santo making in New Mexico introduced by settlers from Mexico.

[5] =>

The exhibition contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos, dating from the late 1700s to 1900. They demonstrate how European stylistic traditions and iconography were combined with new palettes, different styles, and distinctive regional decorative designs that transformed New Mexican santo making into a unique hybrid. Highlighting the exhibit will be esoteric pieces such as the Crucifixion in a Large Nicho by the Laguna Santero and La Santísima Trinidad, a wood retablo with an applied paper painting of the Holy Trinity.

The pieces in Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción show the diverse artistic responses that occurred as santeros answered the demand from their respective communities to bring devotional images into their churches, homes, and lives. The bultos, retablos, and crucifijos presented reveal a visual documentation of New Mexico’s cultural heritage.

The exhibit, once part of the private collection of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Frank, was recently purchased by the New Mexican legislature for the Palace of the Governors, New Mexico History Museum in order to preserve New Mexico’s cultural heritage. It is one of the defining traditional art forms of the region and a source of pride and identity for New Mexican Hispanics.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The exhibition contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos, dating from the late 1700s to 1900. They demonstrate how European stylistic traditions and iconography were combined with new palettes, different styles, and distinctive regional decorative designs that transformed New Mexican santo making into a unique hybrid. Highlighting the exhibit will be esoteric pieces such as the Crucifixion in a Large Nicho by the Laguna Santero and La Santísima Trinidad, a wood retablo with an applied paper painting of the Holy Trinity.

The pieces in Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción show the diverse artistic responses that occurred as santeros answered the demand from their respective communities to bring devotional images into their churches, homes, and lives. The bultos, retablos, and crucifijos presented reveal a visual documentation of New Mexico’s cultural heritage.

The exhibit, once part of the private collection of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Frank, was recently purchased by the New Mexican legislature for the Palace of the Governors, New Mexico History Museum in order to preserve New Mexico’s cultural heritage. It is one of the defining traditional art forms of the region and a source of pride and identity for New Mexican Hispanics.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 31_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 31_thumb.jpg [8] => 2008-07-20 [eventStartDate] => 2008-07-20 [9] => 2030-07-20 [eventEndDate] => 2030-07-20 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 19 [instID] => 19 [15] => 72 [contactID] => 72 [16] => 2017-07-22 13:39:32 [eventUpdated] => 2017-07-22 13:39:32 [17] => 31_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 31_1200.jpg [18] => 19 [19] => New Mexico History Museum [instName] => New Mexico History Museum [20] => 19.jpg [instFileName] => 19.jpg [urlSlug] => treasures-of-devotio ) [4] => Array ( [0] => 214 [eventID] => 214 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now [eventTitle] => Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.

 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.

 

[5] =>

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - with stories told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.

The exhibit is divided into six sections representing chronological periods from the pre-colonial era to the present. Each is set apart by time frames and contrasting views from first-person accounts of the people who lived during the different periods.

AREA 1    BEYOND HISTORY’S RECORDS

“We have lived upon this land from days beyond history’s records, far past any living memory, deep into the time of legend. The story of my people and the story of this place are one single story. No man can think of us without thinking of this place. We are always joined together.”

—Taos Pueblo (Tuah-Tah) elder

Visitors enter the exhibition in a curved space that mimics a cliff wall above a river. Cast-metal handprints of modern-day Native residents are triggered by your hand’s touch to play audios of how New Mexico’s longest inhabitants viewed the land around them. Pottery, baskets and jewelry from pre-European contact convey the first gallery’s main message: Native peoples have lived across present-day New Mexico for thousands of years. They have explored throughout the region and traded with other peoples across North and Central America. The American Southwest remains their home, never empty nor waiting to be discovered, neither a frontier nor a paradise.

AREA 2    THE FAR NORTHERN FRONTIER

The Spanish join the story at the beginning of the next gallery. Chasing legends of gold, the first Spanish explorers pushed into New Mexico in the early 1500s. They found much hardship but no gold, and returned to Mexico or Spain or perished on the way. At the end of the century, Juan de Oñate and his 500 followers founded a capital in northern New Mexico.

Sections within this area include:

The Spanish Mission: For the next 200 years, the Spanish struggled to establish a colony in New Mexico. Missionaries, aristocrats and settlers competed among themselves for land and power. Soldiers and settlers exploited Native American labor, imposed taxes and claimed vast tracts of land. Missionaries sought Christian converts, suppressing Native customs and religion. Spanish and Native life ways mixed and clashed. Exchange and interaction changed both cultures.

The Pueblo Revolt: In 1680, Pueblo Indians across New Mexico rose up in revolt and drove the Spanish from the territory. Spanish soldiers and settlers returned in 1693, ultimately subdued the Pueblo resistance after years of warfare, and re-established a fragile colony. Many Pueblo Indians traveled west to live with Zuni (A:shiwi) and Hopi peoples, some reconciled themselves to the Spanish presence, and some never would.

Neighbors and Strangers: For another century, Spanish and Indian peoples lived together in New Mexico and forged a rough coexistence. After signing treaties with Comanches (Nemene) and other Indians in the late 1700s, the Spanish and Pueblos of New Mexico enjoyed a decade or two of relative peace as the century ended.

AREA 3    LINKING NATIONS

In 1821, the people of Mexico threw off the rule of the Spanish king and created a new nation--the Republic of Mexico, which included present-day New Mexico. Mexicans enjoyed new freedoms to own property, earn a living, and trade. But the new nation also had growing pains. In 1846, the United States invaded and, in a two-year war, defeated the new republic.

Sections within this area include:

Mexican Independence: New Mexicans joined a new republic and grappled with a mixture of new laws and immigrants, and old frustrations.

Trials of a New Nation: In August 1837, Indian peoples and settlers in northern New Mexico began the Chimayó Rebellion. Though they professed loyalty to the republic, they protested taxes from Mexico City and the appointed governors. Gov. Albino Pérez was killed, but the rebellion was crushed.

Santa Fe Trail: The same year that Mexico won independence from Spain, a Missouri trader named William Becknell reached Santa Fe. His path came to be called the Santa Fe Trail--the first and most important of the pathways connecting New Mexico with the United States.

Trails, Traders and New Connections: The Santa Fe Trail was part of a network that opened up commerce across the Southwest. That commerce led to partnerships, settlements, marriages and friction among New Mexicans, Native Americans and Anglo-Americans.

Trappers and Mountain Men: Fur traders and mountain men—Mexican, American and French—traveled the Santa Fe Trail to New Mexico. Many remained to become farmers, ranchers, miners or distillers and began to open New Mexico to American influence.

Shifting Boundaries: Many Americans considered it the nation’s destiny to rule the continent west to the Pacific. New Mexico was caught in the middle. California was the most important goal, but the United States also hoped to pry New Mexico from the Mexican republic, by force if necessary.

The Mexican American War, or la intervención norteamericana: Gen. Stephen Watts Kearny invaded New Mexico in 1846 and installed a military government. Col. Alexander William Doniphan defeated the Mexican army at the Battle of Brazito, near El Paso.

The Taos Rebellion: Many New Mexicans deeply resented U.S. occupation. In 1847, hundreds of Native Americans and Hispanic New Mexicans led by Tomás Ortiz, or “Tomasito,” and Pablo Montoya rebelled against the U.S. territorial government and its appointed officials. Gov. Charles Bent and other officials near Taos were assassinated. U.S. troops from Santa Fe quickly crushed the rebellion, and resistance to the American invasion faded.

Manifest Destiny: New Mexico had very different destinies in the eyes of different New Mexicans. Native Americans, Hispanics and newly arrived Anglo-Americans all imagined and contested different futures for the territory.

AREA 4    BECOMING THE SOUTHWEST

With the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, Mexico lost vast territories, New Mexicans lost their country, and most of modern-day New Mexico became part of the United States. Becoming the "American Southwest" involved decades of accommodation, struggle and violence.

Sections within this exhibit include:

Indian Policy: The U.S. Army established a string of forts across New Mexico, and Native Americans responded with decades of resistance. Army leaders tried to confine Native Americans to a life of farming and raising livestock on reservations. The army forced thousands of Apaches (N’de) and Navajos (Diné) to walk hundreds of miles from their homelands to a reservation. Hundreds of Native Americans perished during this "Long Walk" and their imprisonment at Bosque Redondo near present-day Fort Sumner.

Land and Water: Who owned New Mexico’s land and water—the earth, the king, the people who cared for them, the holders of deeds? Conflicts over land and water created friction and confusion and sometimes erupted in violence, as in the Colfax County and the Lincoln County wars. New Mexico and other parts of the Southwest earned reputations for lawlessness in the late 1800s.The legend of Billy the Kid was born.

The Coming of the Railroad: By the 1880s, the railroad began to transform New Mexico. Trains brought in machinery, workers and manufactured goods—and left with ore, cattle, lumber and agricultural products. As railroads crisscrossed the state, ranching, mining, the timber industry and tourism grew up around them.

Enchantment and "Exploitation": The railroads brought more newcomers to New Mexico and spread word of the enchanting territory. People came for their health, art, the natural beauty, curiosity, scientific interest, to see Native Americans and to make money. They transformed the territory.

AREA 5    OUR PLACE IN THE NATION

New Mexico connects to the nation and the world. Conflicts and challenges—local, national and international—have profound impacts in New Mexico.

Statehood at Last: To become a state, New Mexico struggled to overcome prejudice against Hispanics and Native Americans, political corruption, its reputation for violence and Washington politics. After some 60 years as a territory, New Mexico drafted a constitution and joined the United States on January 6, 1912.

The Great Depression: The effects of the Great Depression were as complicated as New Mexico itself. Some areas suffered greatly, but new federal money poured into the state for agricultural aid and other projects. The Works Progress Administration and other government agencies helped artists, writers, photographers and many others.

World War II: Some 60,000 New Mexicans enlisted in armed forces for WWII. In the early years of the war, New Mexico suffered the highest casualty rate of any state. Displays on the Bataan Death March, Native American code talkers and Japanese internment camps show how New Mexicans were affected by World War II at home and on the battlefield.

New Mexico’s Secret: At Los Alamos, the U.S. government assembled the greatest concentration of scientific resources and brainpower in history to develop the atom bomb—and keep it a secret. The project changed New Mexico by bringing money, scientists and nuclear technology to the state. The bomb changed the world, and concerns about the atomic age began to grow.

The Post-War Booms: In the "Boom" theater, see five short documentaries on the changes New Mexico experienced post-WWII: Route 66, civil rights and land-grant struggles, hippies, continued atomic research, and the sprawling growth of our cities.

AREA 6    MY NEW MEXICO

The past lives in the present. Our memories and traditions will become New Mexico’s history. Whether cowboy, miner, immigrant or scientist, whatever your ethnic or religious background, the stories of New Mexicans today reveal unbroken connections to the past. Our work in ranching, mining, tourism, government, oil and gas, and technology; our ceremonies of celebration; our festivals of feasting and fun; our oral traditions, and our families—these are the stories that touch on all that is important in the long life of an ancient land that became our New Mexico.

Take a moment to write down a story of your own and leave it on the wall. Become part of history!

[eventFullDescription] =>

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - with stories told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.

The exhibit is divided into six sections representing chronological periods from the pre-colonial era to the present. Each is set apart by time frames and contrasting views from first-person accounts of the people who lived during the different periods.

AREA 1    BEYOND HISTORY’S RECORDS

“We have lived upon this land from days beyond history’s records, far past any living memory, deep into the time of legend. The story of my people and the story of this place are one single story. No man can think of us without thinking of this place. We are always joined together.”

—Taos Pueblo (Tuah-Tah) elder

Visitors enter the exhibition in a curved space that mimics a cliff wall above a river. Cast-metal handprints of modern-day Native residents are triggered by your hand’s touch to play audios of how New Mexico’s longest inhabitants viewed the land around them. Pottery, baskets and jewelry from pre-European contact convey the first gallery’s main message: Native peoples have lived across present-day New Mexico for thousands of years. They have explored throughout the region and traded with other peoples across North and Central America. The American Southwest remains their home, never empty nor waiting to be discovered, neither a frontier nor a paradise.

AREA 2    THE FAR NORTHERN FRONTIER

The Spanish join the story at the beginning of the next gallery. Chasing legends of gold, the first Spanish explorers pushed into New Mexico in the early 1500s. They found much hardship but no gold, and returned to Mexico or Spain or perished on the way. At the end of the century, Juan de Oñate and his 500 followers founded a capital in northern New Mexico.

Sections within this area include:

The Spanish Mission: For the next 200 years, the Spanish struggled to establish a colony in New Mexico. Missionaries, aristocrats and settlers competed among themselves for land and power. Soldiers and settlers exploited Native American labor, imposed taxes and claimed vast tracts of land. Missionaries sought Christian converts, suppressing Native customs and religion. Spanish and Native life ways mixed and clashed. Exchange and interaction changed both cultures.

The Pueblo Revolt: In 1680, Pueblo Indians across New Mexico rose up in revolt and drove the Spanish from the territory. Spanish soldiers and settlers returned in 1693, ultimately subdued the Pueblo resistance after years of warfare, and re-established a fragile colony. Many Pueblo Indians traveled west to live with Zuni (A:shiwi) and Hopi peoples, some reconciled themselves to the Spanish presence, and some never would.

Neighbors and Strangers: For another century, Spanish and Indian peoples lived together in New Mexico and forged a rough coexistence. After signing treaties with Comanches (Nemene) and other Indians in the late 1700s, the Spanish and Pueblos of New Mexico enjoyed a decade or two of relative peace as the century ended.

AREA 3    LINKING NATIONS

In 1821, the people of Mexico threw off the rule of the Spanish king and created a new nation--the Republic of Mexico, which included present-day New Mexico. Mexicans enjoyed new freedoms to own property, earn a living, and trade. But the new nation also had growing pains. In 1846, the United States invaded and, in a two-year war, defeated the new republic.

Sections within this area include:

Mexican Independence: New Mexicans joined a new republic and grappled with a mixture of new laws and immigrants, and old frustrations.

Trials of a New Nation: In August 1837, Indian peoples and settlers in northern New Mexico began the Chimayó Rebellion. Though they professed loyalty to the republic, they protested taxes from Mexico City and the appointed governors. Gov. Albino Pérez was killed, but the rebellion was crushed.

Santa Fe Trail: The same year that Mexico won independence from Spain, a Missouri trader named William Becknell reached Santa Fe. His path came to be called the Santa Fe Trail--the first and most important of the pathways connecting New Mexico with the United States.

Trails, Traders and New Connections: The Santa Fe Trail was part of a network that opened up commerce across the Southwest. That commerce led to partnerships, settlements, marriages and friction among New Mexicans, Native Americans and Anglo-Americans.

Trappers and Mountain Men: Fur traders and mountain men—Mexican, American and French—traveled the Santa Fe Trail to New Mexico. Many remained to become farmers, ranchers, miners or distillers and began to open New Mexico to American influence.

Shifting Boundaries: Many Americans considered it the nation’s destiny to rule the continent west to the Pacific. New Mexico was caught in the middle. California was the most important goal, but the United States also hoped to pry New Mexico from the Mexican republic, by force if necessary.

The Mexican American War, or la intervención norteamericana: Gen. Stephen Watts Kearny invaded New Mexico in 1846 and installed a military government. Col. Alexander William Doniphan defeated the Mexican army at the Battle of Brazito, near El Paso.

The Taos Rebellion: Many New Mexicans deeply resented U.S. occupation. In 1847, hundreds of Native Americans and Hispanic New Mexicans led by Tomás Ortiz, or “Tomasito,” and Pablo Montoya rebelled against the U.S. territorial government and its appointed officials. Gov. Charles Bent and other officials near Taos were assassinated. U.S. troops from Santa Fe quickly crushed the rebellion, and resistance to the American invasion faded.

Manifest Destiny: New Mexico had very different destinies in the eyes of different New Mexicans. Native Americans, Hispanics and newly arrived Anglo-Americans all imagined and contested different futures for the territory.

AREA 4    BECOMING THE SOUTHWEST

With the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, Mexico lost vast territories, New Mexicans lost their country, and most of modern-day New Mexico became part of the United States. Becoming the "American Southwest" involved decades of accommodation, struggle and violence.

Sections within this exhibit include:

Indian Policy: The U.S. Army established a string of forts across New Mexico, and Native Americans responded with decades of resistance. Army leaders tried to confine Native Americans to a life of farming and raising livestock on reservations. The army forced thousands of Apaches (N’de) and Navajos (Diné) to walk hundreds of miles from their homelands to a reservation. Hundreds of Native Americans perished during this "Long Walk" and their imprisonment at Bosque Redondo near present-day Fort Sumner.

Land and Water: Who owned New Mexico’s land and water—the earth, the king, the people who cared for them, the holders of deeds? Conflicts over land and water created friction and confusion and sometimes erupted in violence, as in the Colfax County and the Lincoln County wars. New Mexico and other parts of the Southwest earned reputations for lawlessness in the late 1800s.The legend of Billy the Kid was born.

The Coming of the Railroad: By the 1880s, the railroad began to transform New Mexico. Trains brought in machinery, workers and manufactured goods—and left with ore, cattle, lumber and agricultural products. As railroads crisscrossed the state, ranching, mining, the timber industry and tourism grew up around them.

Enchantment and "Exploitation": The railroads brought more newcomers to New Mexico and spread word of the enchanting territory. People came for their health, art, the natural beauty, curiosity, scientific interest, to see Native Americans and to make money. They transformed the territory.

AREA 5    OUR PLACE IN THE NATION

New Mexico connects to the nation and the world. Conflicts and challenges—local, national and international—have profound impacts in New Mexico.

Statehood at Last: To become a state, New Mexico struggled to overcome prejudice against Hispanics and Native Americans, political corruption, its reputation for violence and Washington politics. After some 60 years as a territory, New Mexico drafted a constitution and joined the United States on January 6, 1912.

The Great Depression: The effects of the Great Depression were as complicated as New Mexico itself. Some areas suffered greatly, but new federal money poured into the state for agricultural aid and other projects. The Works Progress Administration and other government agencies helped artists, writers, photographers and many others.

World War II: Some 60,000 New Mexicans enlisted in armed forces for WWII. In the early years of the war, New Mexico suffered the highest casualty rate of any state. Displays on the Bataan Death March, Native American code talkers and Japanese internment camps show how New Mexicans were affected by World War II at home and on the battlefield.

New Mexico’s Secret: At Los Alamos, the U.S. government assembled the greatest concentration of scientific resources and brainpower in history to develop the atom bomb—and keep it a secret. The project changed New Mexico by bringing money, scientists and nuclear technology to the state. The bomb changed the world, and concerns about the atomic age began to grow.

The Post-War Booms: In the "Boom" theater, see five short documentaries on the changes New Mexico experienced post-WWII: Route 66, civil rights and land-grant struggles, hippies, continued atomic research, and the sprawling growth of our cities.

AREA 6    MY NEW MEXICO

The past lives in the present. Our memories and traditions will become New Mexico’s history. Whether cowboy, miner, immigrant or scientist, whatever your ethnic or religious background, the stories of New Mexicans today reveal unbroken connections to the past. Our work in ranching, mining, tourism, government, oil and gas, and technology; our ceremonies of celebration; our festivals of feasting and fun; our oral traditions, and our families—these are the stories that touch on all that is important in the long life of an ancient land that became our New Mexico.

Take a moment to write down a story of your own and leave it on the wall. Become part of history!

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Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital.

Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital.

Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.

[5] =>

Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital.

Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.

“This exhibition gives visitors a broad perspective of the settling of Santa Fe and the web of cultural influences the Spanish brought with them,” Diaz said. “The founding of Santa Fe is a big and complex story to tell, and this show offers a glimpse of different aspects of Spanish colonial life, from the domestic to the economic to the political and religious.”

Santa Fe Found serves as living proof of how the lives of the founders were lived, including who they married, the hardships they faced, the tools they used and the foods they ate. (Hint: Carne Adovada was generations away; turkey, deer and rabbit were often the dish of the day.)

Prior to the construction of the New Mexico History Museum, which opened in May 2009, Post and his fellow archaeologists conducted a two-year dig to investigate the archaeology of the site at 113 Lincoln Ave., just off the Santa Fe Plaza. More than 90,000 artifacts were unearthed from the 17th-century, revealing tales of life as it once was.

“Surprising to some and not to others, the New Mexico History Museum was complex and rich in the information it yielded on 300 years of people living and working behind the Palace of the Governors,” Post said. “Combined with Dedie Snow’s 1974-1975 excavations within the Palace, our work gives a unique inside-outside look at a central place in New Mexico history.”

Other featured archaeological sites add to the story. The Baca-Garvisu site was the home of a prominent Santa Fe family in the 1700s, located where the Santa Fe Community Convention Center now stands. The Sanchez Site, an early Spanish estancia, or rural settlement, was partly excavated in the 1980s and is now managed by El Rancho de los Golondrinas. Also prominent in the exhibition is San Gabriel del Yungue at the Pueblo of Ohkay Owingeh, where the first Spanish colonists briefly set their roots.

Spain’s far northern colony of Santa Fe was reached by a six-month journey up El Camino Real, a barely mapped and uncertain route that held only hazy promises of water and shelter. Holding together a caravan of 700 people – soldiers, friars, men and a few women and children – and the tools and livestock it would take to build a new colony tested the explorers’ abilities and, sometimes, their humanity.

Some of the artifacts show that, despite the frontier conditions, fine goods had managed to travel up El Camino Real to homes and missions in the colony. A sampling of the pottery that was found on the digs includes Spanish majolica, blue-and-white Mexican pottery modeled on examples from the Ming Dynasty in China, colorful Mexican pottery and Pueblo pottery. Also found were tobacco pipes, gold earrings, gunflints and arrowheads.

A few sherds of the pottery found by archaeologists speak to a monumental expedition. Centuries past, they were parts of delicate Ming vases loaded onto a Spanish galleon at a Chinese port for an ocean journey then a bumpy trip up El Camino Real to the young colony.

“Considering the Chinese pottery traveled across the ocean and then 1,600 miles up the Camino Real, it’s not surprising – and it’s even amazing – that we found only one or two pieces of these vessels,” Post said.

From these roots grew La Villa Real de Santa Fe, the Royal City of Santa Fe. What do the historical accounts say of the homes they built and the crops they grew? What has the soil yielded of their lives, the fragile beginnings of a young Spanish colony?

Come to the exhibit to find out.

Funding for the Santa Fe Found exhibition and lecture series was made possible by the Palace Guard, a support group of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation; the Gala Opening Committee; Friends of Archaeology, a support group of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation; the Santa Fe 400th; and the Museum of New Mexico Foundation.

 

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital.

Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.

“This exhibition gives visitors a broad perspective of the settling of Santa Fe and the web of cultural influences the Spanish brought with them,” Diaz said. “The founding of Santa Fe is a big and complex story to tell, and this show offers a glimpse of different aspects of Spanish colonial life, from the domestic to the economic to the political and religious.”

Santa Fe Found serves as living proof of how the lives of the founders were lived, including who they married, the hardships they faced, the tools they used and the foods they ate. (Hint: Carne Adovada was generations away; turkey, deer and rabbit were often the dish of the day.)

Prior to the construction of the New Mexico History Museum, which opened in May 2009, Post and his fellow archaeologists conducted a two-year dig to investigate the archaeology of the site at 113 Lincoln Ave., just off the Santa Fe Plaza. More than 90,000 artifacts were unearthed from the 17th-century, revealing tales of life as it once was.

“Surprising to some and not to others, the New Mexico History Museum was complex and rich in the information it yielded on 300 years of people living and working behind the Palace of the Governors,” Post said. “Combined with Dedie Snow’s 1974-1975 excavations within the Palace, our work gives a unique inside-outside look at a central place in New Mexico history.”

Other featured archaeological sites add to the story. The Baca-Garvisu site was the home of a prominent Santa Fe family in the 1700s, located where the Santa Fe Community Convention Center now stands. The Sanchez Site, an early Spanish estancia, or rural settlement, was partly excavated in the 1980s and is now managed by El Rancho de los Golondrinas. Also prominent in the exhibition is San Gabriel del Yungue at the Pueblo of Ohkay Owingeh, where the first Spanish colonists briefly set their roots.

Spain’s far northern colony of Santa Fe was reached by a six-month journey up El Camino Real, a barely mapped and uncertain route that held only hazy promises of water and shelter. Holding together a caravan of 700 people – soldiers, friars, men and a few women and children – and the tools and livestock it would take to build a new colony tested the explorers’ abilities and, sometimes, their humanity.

Some of the artifacts show that, despite the frontier conditions, fine goods had managed to travel up El Camino Real to homes and missions in the colony. A sampling of the pottery that was found on the digs includes Spanish majolica, blue-and-white Mexican pottery modeled on examples from the Ming Dynasty in China, colorful Mexican pottery and Pueblo pottery. Also found were tobacco pipes, gold earrings, gunflints and arrowheads.

A few sherds of the pottery found by archaeologists speak to a monumental expedition. Centuries past, they were parts of delicate Ming vases loaded onto a Spanish galleon at a Chinese port for an ocean journey then a bumpy trip up El Camino Real to the young colony.

“Considering the Chinese pottery traveled across the ocean and then 1,600 miles up the Camino Real, it’s not surprising – and it’s even amazing – that we found only one or two pieces of these vessels,” Post said.

From these roots grew La Villa Real de Santa Fe, the Royal City of Santa Fe. What do the historical accounts say of the homes they built and the crops they grew? What has the soil yielded of their lives, the fragile beginnings of a young Spanish colony?

Come to the exhibit to find out.

Funding for the Santa Fe Found exhibition and lecture series was made possible by the Palace Guard, a support group of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation; the Gala Opening Committee; Friends of Archaeology, a support group of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation; the Santa Fe 400th; and the Museum of New Mexico Foundation.

 

 

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Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

[5] =>

The Girard Collection: Enduring Appeal It is entirely possible to be both delighted and overwhelmed by the Alexander Girard’s one-of-a-kind exhibition—even after more than twenty-five years. The vastness of the exhibit space, the complexity of the design, the sheer quantity of objects on display—the immensity and intensity can be overpowering. And compelling.That’s why Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

With his singular vision and intuitive understanding of the multiplicity of cultures and artistic genres, perhaps Girard himself felt the same unflagging delight when he was designing the exhibit. Girard rewards those who look carefully with touches of wit and whimsy, amazing us with his command of detail and sense of perspective. He appeals to children and adults alike who peer into the sets from different angles, to glimpse people and animals, puppets, dolls, and small figures of clay, wood, paper, cloth, and, yes, even plastics. Some look familiar, clearly identifiable as the products of specific cultures and places. Others take us to places we can only imagine. Who can ever tire of going back to these places of enjoyment and creativity?

The Girard Family collection of more than 100,000 objects is unique in part because of its size and breadth: more than 100 countries on six continents are represented. Enjoy this text-free gallery with or without a docent, pick up a Gallery Guide to read more about the cases, or pick up a multi-media tour on an Ipod touch available at the front desk for no additional fee.

"I believe we should preserve this evidence of the past, not as a pattern for sentimental imitation, but as nourishment for the creative spirit of the present."

- Alexander Girard

 

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

The Girard Collection: Enduring Appeal It is entirely possible to be both delighted and overwhelmed by the Alexander Girard’s one-of-a-kind exhibition—even after more than twenty-five years. The vastness of the exhibit space, the complexity of the design, the sheer quantity of objects on display—the immensity and intensity can be overpowering. And compelling.That’s why Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

With his singular vision and intuitive understanding of the multiplicity of cultures and artistic genres, perhaps Girard himself felt the same unflagging delight when he was designing the exhibit. Girard rewards those who look carefully with touches of wit and whimsy, amazing us with his command of detail and sense of perspective. He appeals to children and adults alike who peer into the sets from different angles, to glimpse people and animals, puppets, dolls, and small figures of clay, wood, paper, cloth, and, yes, even plastics. Some look familiar, clearly identifiable as the products of specific cultures and places. Others take us to places we can only imagine. Who can ever tire of going back to these places of enjoyment and creativity?

The Girard Family collection of more than 100,000 objects is unique in part because of its size and breadth: more than 100 countries on six continents are represented. Enjoy this text-free gallery with or without a docent, pick up a Gallery Guide to read more about the cases, or pick up a multi-media tour on an Ipod touch available at the front desk for no additional fee.

"I believe we should preserve this evidence of the past, not as a pattern for sentimental imitation, but as nourishment for the creative spirit of the present."

- Alexander Girard

 

 

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Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry.

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry.

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

[5] =>

Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry.

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

“People don’t always realize that many of the turning points in the company’s history are specific to New Mexico,” said Meredith Davidson, curator of 19th- and 20th-century Southwest collections. “The Harvey Girls were invented in Raton. Native American jewelry, pottery, blankets and other goods were shaped by sales at the Alvarado’s Indian Room in Albuquerque. Tourists experienced `the authentic Southwest’ through Indian Detours that left from Santa Fe’s La Fonda Hotel and countless others.

“In many ways, Fred Harvey and the AT&SF Railway grew up together in New Mexico. As tracks were laid through cities, a Harvey House appeared. From small eating houses in cities like Deming, to large hotels like the Alvarado, each place left an imprint on the local community as well as on the tourists who returned to their homes with tales of that Fred Harvey experience.”

Artifacts in the exhibit include: the original Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway track sign for Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel; Harvey Girl uniforms (including the unique embroidered blouse worn by La Fonda waitresses in the 1950s); furniture designed by famed architect and interior decorator Mary Colter; hand-stamped Navajo spoons; Fred Harvey’s original datebook and an iconic painting of the man behind the empire. Other artifacts include a gong similar to ones that rang travelers to their meals (this one hung in the company’s Chicago office) and an original Doris Lee painting while helping to plan MGM’s The Harvey Girls, starring Judy Garland. The image Lee created was adopted by the Harvey Company and used on menus at El Navajo in Gallup and El Tovar at the Grand Canyon.

In addition, an interactive station will feature excerpts of Harvey Girl interviews conducted by Katrina Parks for her 2013 documentary, The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound.

Opening events, Sunday, December 7, 2014:

10 am, 11 am, noon and 4 pm, see The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound, a 57-minute documentary, in the museum auditorium

2 pm, gather in the auditorium for a conversation with curator Meredith Davidson, documentary producer Katrina Parks, and Stephen Fried, author of the acclaimed biography Appetite for America

3 pm, refreshments in the lobby

Free with admission; Sundays free to NM residents; children 16 and under free daily

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry.

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

“People don’t always realize that many of the turning points in the company’s history are specific to New Mexico,” said Meredith Davidson, curator of 19th- and 20th-century Southwest collections. “The Harvey Girls were invented in Raton. Native American jewelry, pottery, blankets and other goods were shaped by sales at the Alvarado’s Indian Room in Albuquerque. Tourists experienced `the authentic Southwest’ through Indian Detours that left from Santa Fe’s La Fonda Hotel and countless others.

“In many ways, Fred Harvey and the AT&SF Railway grew up together in New Mexico. As tracks were laid through cities, a Harvey House appeared. From small eating houses in cities like Deming, to large hotels like the Alvarado, each place left an imprint on the local community as well as on the tourists who returned to their homes with tales of that Fred Harvey experience.”

Artifacts in the exhibit include: the original Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway track sign for Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel; Harvey Girl uniforms (including the unique embroidered blouse worn by La Fonda waitresses in the 1950s); furniture designed by famed architect and interior decorator Mary Colter; hand-stamped Navajo spoons; Fred Harvey’s original datebook and an iconic painting of the man behind the empire. Other artifacts include a gong similar to ones that rang travelers to their meals (this one hung in the company’s Chicago office) and an original Doris Lee painting while helping to plan MGM’s The Harvey Girls, starring Judy Garland. The image Lee created was adopted by the Harvey Company and used on menus at El Navajo in Gallup and El Tovar at the Grand Canyon.

In addition, an interactive station will feature excerpts of Harvey Girl interviews conducted by Katrina Parks for her 2013 documentary, The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound.

Opening events, Sunday, December 7, 2014:

10 am, 11 am, noon and 4 pm, see The Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound, a 57-minute documentary, in the museum auditorium

2 pm, gather in the auditorium for a conversation with curator Meredith Davidson, documentary producer Katrina Parks, and Stephen Fried, author of the acclaimed biography Appetite for America

3 pm, refreshments in the lobby

Free with admission; Sundays free to NM residents; children 16 and under free daily

 

[6] => www.nmhistorymuseum.org [eventURL] => www.nmhistorymuseum.org [7] => 1950_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 1950_thumb.jpg [8] => 2014-12-07 [eventStartDate] => 2014-12-07 [9] => 2030-12-31 [eventEndDate] => 2030-12-31 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 19 [instID] => 19 [15] => 72 [contactID] => 72 [16] => 2017-07-04 18:45:31 [eventUpdated] => 2017-07-04 18:45:31 [17] => 1950_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 1950_1200.jpg [18] => 19 [19] => New Mexico History Museum [instName] => New Mexico History Museum [20] => 19.jpg [instFileName] => 19.jpg [urlSlug] => setting-the-standard ) [8] => Array ( [0] => 3406 [eventID] => 3406 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => New Mexico Colonial Home – Circa 1815 [eventTitle] => New Mexico Colonial Home – Circa 1815 [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

[5] =>

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

Walk through the home and see period artifacts and get a feel for colonial New Mexico. Most houses of the period followed a design typical of the regions surrounding the Mediterranean Sea (Southern Europe, the Middle East and North Africa), with single rooms built end-to-end around a central courtyard (placita). Doors and windows from each room opened onto the placita. The artifacts and features of the New Mexico colonial home are based on archaeological information from excavations, wills, and inventories from the late 1700s to 1800s.

The New Mexico Colonial Home is on long-term display.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

Walk through the home and see period artifacts and get a feel for colonial New Mexico. Most houses of the period followed a design typical of the regions surrounding the Mediterranean Sea (Southern Europe, the Middle East and North Africa), with single rooms built end-to-end around a central courtyard (placita). Doors and windows from each room opened onto the placita. The artifacts and features of the New Mexico colonial home are based on archaeological information from excavations, wills, and inventories from the late 1700s to 1800s.

The New Mexico Colonial Home is on long-term display.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3406_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3406_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-01-01 [eventStartDate] => 2017-01-01 [9] => 2030-01-01 [eventEndDate] => 2030-01-01 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 28 [instID] => 28 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 10:31:15 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 10:31:15 [17] => 3406_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3406_1200.jpg [18] => 28 [19] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [instName] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [20] => 28.jpg [instFileName] => 28.jpg [urlSlug] => new-mexico-colonial- ) [9] => Array ( [0] => 3407 [eventID] => 3407 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Icons of Exploration [eventTitle] => Icons of Exploration [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

[5] =>

Icons of Exploration, a permanent exhibition at the New Mexico Museum of Space History, showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

Throughout the exhibition, visitors are introduced to themes and subjects that are revisited and developed in other areas of the museum.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Icons of Exploration, a permanent exhibition at the New Mexico Museum of Space History, showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

Throughout the exhibition, visitors are introduced to themes and subjects that are revisited and developed in other areas of the museum.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3407_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3407_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-01-01 [eventStartDate] => 2017-01-01 [9] => 2030-01-01 [eventEndDate] => 2030-01-01 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 40 [instID] => 40 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 10:16:58 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 10:16:58 [17] => 3407_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3407_1200.jpg [18] => 40 [19] => New Mexico Museum of Space History [instName] => New Mexico Museum of Space History [20] => 40.jpg [instFileName] => 40.jpg [urlSlug] => icons-of-exploration ) [10] => Array ( [0] => 3408 [eventID] => 3408 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => The Cowboy Way: Drawings by Robert ’Shoofly’ Shufelt [eventTitle] => The Cowboy Way: Drawings by Robert ’Shoofly’ Shufelt [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.

[5] =>

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.

“Robert Shufelt is world-renowned,” said Museum Chief Curator Toni Laumbach. “He is among the best in the field of fine art that depicts the cowboy and daily ranch life.” Shoofly’s respect for ranching as a way of life is clearly stated in his art. He has raised horses and cattle, and his art portrays a story of hard work and relationships with animals.

Shufelt, who says being an artist “is a compulsion, not a decision,” is a master of the pencil. He brings to life dramatic imagery with bold sunlight and shadow. Each original drawing is astonishing with complexity of composition and disciplined draftsmanship. The prints are done in runs of 300 or less.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.

“Robert Shufelt is world-renowned,” said Museum Chief Curator Toni Laumbach. “He is among the best in the field of fine art that depicts the cowboy and daily ranch life.” Shoofly’s respect for ranching as a way of life is clearly stated in his art. He has raised horses and cattle, and his art portrays a story of hard work and relationships with animals.

Shufelt, who says being an artist “is a compulsion, not a decision,” is a master of the pencil. He brings to life dramatic imagery with bold sunlight and shadow. Each original drawing is astonishing with complexity of composition and disciplined draftsmanship. The prints are done in runs of 300 or less.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3408_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3408_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-01-01 [eventStartDate] => 2017-01-01 [9] => 2030-01-01 [eventEndDate] => 2030-01-01 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 28 [instID] => 28 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 11:32:38 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 11:32:38 [17] => 3408_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3408_1200.jpg [18] => 28 [19] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [instName] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [20] => 28.jpg [instFileName] => 28.jpg [urlSlug] => the-cowboy-way-drawi ) [11] => Array ( [0] => 3409 [eventID] => 3409 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => John P. Stapp Air & Space Park [eventTitle] => John P. Stapp Air & Space Park [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankinds exploration of space.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankinds exploration of space.

[5] =>

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankind’s exploration of space.

Examples of exhibits include the Sonic Wind I rocket sled ridden by Dr. Stapp and the Little Joe II rocket which tested the Apollo Launch Escape System.

At 86 feet tall, Little Joe II is the largest rocket ever launched from New Mexico.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankind’s exploration of space.

Examples of exhibits include the Sonic Wind I rocket sled ridden by Dr. Stapp and the Little Joe II rocket which tested the Apollo Launch Escape System.

At 86 feet tall, Little Joe II is the largest rocket ever launched from New Mexico.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3409_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3409_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-01-01 [eventStartDate] => 2017-01-01 [9] => 2030-01-01 [eventEndDate] => 2030-01-01 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 40 [instID] => 40 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 10:53:47 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 10:53:47 [17] => 3409_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3409_1200.jpg [18] => 40 [19] => New Mexico Museum of Space History [instName] => New Mexico Museum of Space History [20] => 40.jpg [instFileName] => 40.jpg [urlSlug] => john-p-stapp-air-spa ) [12] => Array ( [0] => 3410 [eventID] => 3410 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Generations [eventTitle] => Generations [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

The Museum’s first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico. 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The Museum’s first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico. 

[5] =>

The Museum’s first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico.

The exhibit uses the biographies of 33 people from New Mexico’s history – some famous, some not famous – to tell the story. It features ancient tools, a replica of a Mogollon pithouse, audio interviews and hands-on activities.

Generations is on long-term display in the Main Exhibitions Gallery.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The Museum’s first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico.

The exhibit uses the biographies of 33 people from New Mexico’s history – some famous, some not famous – to tell the story. It features ancient tools, a replica of a Mogollon pithouse, audio interviews and hands-on activities.

Generations is on long-term display in the Main Exhibitions Gallery.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3410_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3410_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-01-01 [eventStartDate] => 2017-01-01 [9] => 2030-01-01 [eventEndDate] => 2030-01-01 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 28 [instID] => 28 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 11:39:25 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 11:39:25 [17] => 3410_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3410_1200.jpg [18] => 28 [19] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [instName] => New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum [20] => 28.jpg [instFileName] => 28.jpg [urlSlug] => generations ) [13] => Array ( [0] => 3412 [eventID] => 3412 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => ¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! [eventTitle] => ¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! celebrates the NHCC Art Museum’s growing permanent collection with a revitalized vibe and a brand new selection of works. This exhibition was a collaborative project as the entire NHCC Visual Arts staff and interns combed through the collection and worked together to decide which pieces should welcome in 2017. This sampling explores the contributions of these artists and how each work can serve as a reminder of the heart that thrives in strong and resilient communities.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! celebrates the NHCC Art Museum’s growing permanent collection with a revitalized vibe and a brand new selection of works. This exhibition was a collaborative project as the entire NHCC Visual Arts staff and interns combed through the collection and worked together to decide which pieces should welcome in 2017. This sampling explores the contributions of these artists and how each work can serve as a reminder of the heart that thrives in strong and resilient communities.

[5] =>

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! celebrates the NHCC Art Museum’s growing permanent collection with a revitalized vibe and a brand new selection of works. This exhibition was a collaborative project as the entire NHCC Visual Arts staff and interns combed through the collection and worked together to decide which pieces should welcome in 2017. This sampling explores the contributions of these artists and how each work can serve as a reminder of the heart that thrives in strong and resilient communities.

The collection contains over 2,500 artworks by Hispanic, Chicana/o, and Latina/o, artists from around the globe most of which have been generously donated to the museum by artists and collectors. It reflects the diversity of Latina/o art and expression in all of its vibrancy, creativity, pointed humor and social consciousness. The National Hispanic Cultural Center Art Museum exists to support and engage the work of these artists and share their creations and their stories with the broader community.

[eventFullDescription] =>

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! celebrates the NHCC Art Museum’s growing permanent collection with a revitalized vibe and a brand new selection of works. This exhibition was a collaborative project as the entire NHCC Visual Arts staff and interns combed through the collection and worked together to decide which pieces should welcome in 2017. This sampling explores the contributions of these artists and how each work can serve as a reminder of the heart that thrives in strong and resilient communities.

The collection contains over 2,500 artworks by Hispanic, Chicana/o, and Latina/o, artists from around the globe most of which have been generously donated to the museum by artists and collectors. It reflects the diversity of Latina/o art and expression in all of its vibrancy, creativity, pointed humor and social consciousness. The National Hispanic Cultural Center Art Museum exists to support and engage the work of these artists and share their creations and their stories with the broader community.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3412_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3412_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-03-05 [eventStartDate] => 2017-03-05 [9] => 2018-12-31 [eventEndDate] => 2018-12-31 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 36 [instID] => 36 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-08-22 12:09:40 [eventUpdated] => 2017-08-22 12:09:40 [17] => 3412_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3412_1200.jpg [18] => 36 [19] => National Hispanic Cultural Center [instName] => National Hispanic Cultural Center [20] => 36.jpg [instFileName] => 36.jpg [urlSlug] => aqui-estamos-the-hea ) [14] => Array ( [0] => 2834 [eventID] => 2834 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art [eventTitle] => No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Tramp art is the product of industry, a style of woodworking from the late 19th and early 20th centuries that made use of discarded cigar boxes and fruit crates that were notched and layered to make a variety of domestic objects.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Tramp art is the product of industry, a style of woodworking from the late 19th and early 20th centuries that made use of discarded cigar boxes and fruit crates that were notched and layered to make a variety of domestic objects.

[5] =>

No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art will present more than 150 examples of tramp art, concentrating on works the from the United States, with additional examples from France, Germany, Switzerland, Scandinavia, Canada, Mexico and Brazil to demonstrate the far reach this art form has had.

This is the first large-scale museum exhibition dedicated to tramp art since 1975. For many years, “tramp art” was believed to have been made by itinerants and hobos, thus its name. It has been demonstrated that this notion is largely erroneous, however the name “tramp art” has remained the only terminology used for this practice, and the paucity of scholarly studies to dispel the mistaken notions about tramp art have allowed the myths to persist. No Idle Hands will examine the assumptions related to class, quality, and the anonymity of the makers of tramp art and consider this practice instead through the lens of home and family while tracing its relationship to industry—whether as individual ethos or big industry. No Idle Hands will also include works by contemporary makers, thus establishing tramp art as an ongoing folk art form rather than a vestige of the past.

[eventFullDescription] =>

No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art will present more than 150 examples of tramp art, concentrating on works the from the United States, with additional examples from France, Germany, Switzerland, Scandinavia, Canada, Mexico and Brazil to demonstrate the far reach this art form has had.

This is the first large-scale museum exhibition dedicated to tramp art since 1975. For many years, “tramp art” was believed to have been made by itinerants and hobos, thus its name. It has been demonstrated that this notion is largely erroneous, however the name “tramp art” has remained the only terminology used for this practice, and the paucity of scholarly studies to dispel the mistaken notions about tramp art have allowed the myths to persist. No Idle Hands will examine the assumptions related to class, quality, and the anonymity of the makers of tramp art and consider this practice instead through the lens of home and family while tracing its relationship to industry—whether as individual ethos or big industry. No Idle Hands will also include works by contemporary makers, thus establishing tramp art as an ongoing folk art form rather than a vestige of the past.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 2834_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 2834_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-03-12 [eventStartDate] => 2017-03-12 [9] => 2018-09-16 [eventEndDate] => 2018-09-16 [10] => 10:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 10:00:00 [11] => 17:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 17:00:00 [12] => 2 [recurID] => 2 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 2 [instID] => 2 [15] => 93 [contactID] => 93 [16] => 2017-11-13 09:11:50 [eventUpdated] => 2017-11-13 09:11:50 [17] => 2834_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 2834_1200.jpg [18] => 2 [19] => Museum of International Folk Art [instName] => Museum of International Folk Art [20] => 2.jpg [instFileName] => 2.jpg [urlSlug] => no-idle-hands-the-my ) [15] => Array ( [0] => 3047 [eventID] => 3047 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Artistic Heritage: Syrian Folk Art [eventTitle] => Artistic Heritage: Syrian Folk Art [3] => on Display in Lloyd’s Treasure Chest [eventSubTitle] => on Display in Lloyd’s Treasure Chest [4] =>

Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest offers a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest offers a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.

[5] =>

Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest offers a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.

Visitors are invited to think about folk art. In fact, there is no one definition of folk art. In collecting and displaying folk art, the museum considers various concepts: Folk art is traditional art, reflecting shared cultural aesthetics, community values, priorities, and social issues. Folk art may change over time and include innovations in traditions. Folk art is handmade, although it may include new, synthetic, or recycled components. Folk art may constitute income and empowerment for an individual, a family, or a community. Folk art may be art of the everyday or reserved for special occasions. Folk art may be learned formally or informally, from family or other artists. Folk art may be intangible, including various forms of expressive culture like dance, song, poetry, and food ways. Folk art is of, by, and for the people. We mean all people, inclusive of class, culture, community, ethnicity, and religion. Together, we can consider the multitude of perspectives and come closer to understanding “What is Folk Art?”

Rotating thematic displays will offer close-up views of the museum’s folk art collection. In collaboration with the New Mexico History Museum’s exhibition Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat, opening June 23, 2017;   MOIFA’s display of Syrian folk art opened June 4, 2017. Hands on activities appropriate for ages 3 to 103 in the gallery include: coloring activities, origami and a Javanese musical instrument.  The cultural context of folk art can be explored with a map, book area. The notion that Folk Art may be intangible is explored with a musical instrument: a gender, a gamelan instrument The re-opening brings back some old favorites from past exhibitions, including “Last of the Red Hot Lovers”, an American sculpture made from recycled metal by artist Dwight Martinek (aka “Wild Willie”), “The Followers of Ghandi” by renowned Master Folk artists Nek Chand, and a Wedding Rickshaw from Bangladesh.

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest offers a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.

Visitors are invited to think about folk art. In fact, there is no one definition of folk art. In collecting and displaying folk art, the museum considers various concepts: Folk art is traditional art, reflecting shared cultural aesthetics, community values, priorities, and social issues. Folk art may change over time and include innovations in traditions. Folk art is handmade, although it may include new, synthetic, or recycled components. Folk art may constitute income and empowerment for an individual, a family, or a community. Folk art may be art of the everyday or reserved for special occasions. Folk art may be learned formally or informally, from family or other artists. Folk art may be intangible, including various forms of expressive culture like dance, song, poetry, and food ways. Folk art is of, by, and for the people. We mean all people, inclusive of class, culture, community, ethnicity, and religion. Together, we can consider the multitude of perspectives and come closer to understanding “What is Folk Art?”

Rotating thematic displays will offer close-up views of the museum’s folk art collection. In collaboration with the New Mexico History Museum’s exhibition Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat, opening June 23, 2017;   MOIFA’s display of Syrian folk art opened June 4, 2017. Hands on activities appropriate for ages 3 to 103 in the gallery include: coloring activities, origami and a Javanese musical instrument.  The cultural context of folk art can be explored with a map, book area. The notion that Folk Art may be intangible is explored with a musical instrument: a gender, a gamelan instrument The re-opening brings back some old favorites from past exhibitions, including “Last of the Red Hot Lovers”, an American sculpture made from recycled metal by artist Dwight Martinek (aka “Wild Willie”), “The Followers of Ghandi” by renowned Master Folk artists Nek Chand, and a Wedding Rickshaw from Bangladesh.

 

[6] => http://moifa.org [eventURL] => http://moifa.org [7] => 3047_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3047_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-06-04 [eventStartDate] => 2017-06-04 [9] => 2018-07-29 [eventEndDate] => 2018-07-29 [10] => 10:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 10:00:00 [11] => 17:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 17:00:00 [12] => 3 [recurID] => 3 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 2 [instID] => 2 [15] => 40 [contactID] => 40 [16] => 2018-02-09 12:05:41 [eventUpdated] => 2018-02-09 12:05:41 [17] => 3047_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3047_1200.jpg [18] => 2 [19] => Museum of International Folk Art [instName] => Museum of International Folk Art [20] => 2.jpg [instFileName] => 2.jpg [urlSlug] => artistic-heritage-sy ) [16] => Array ( [0] => 3148 [eventID] => 3148 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West [eventTitle] => Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Footwear is evocative. It tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration, reflecting the lives of makers and wearers and offering a window into the past and the present.

This exhibition features sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions; includes Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and exhibited for the first time in decades; and concludes with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses.

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017, and will be on display through the end of 2018.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Footwear is evocative. It tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration, reflecting the lives of makers and wearers and offering a window into the past and the present.

This exhibition features sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions; includes Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and exhibited for the first time in decades; and concludes with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses.

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017, and will be on display through the end of 2018.

[5] =>

Footwear is evocative. The shoe tells us if the wearer was a child or an adult, and can often tell us whether they were an adult man or woman, based on size and style. Shoes retain signs of the wearer, showing imprints of toes and heels and repairs made as much-needed or much-loved footwear became ragged. They can also hint at health problems; for example, bunions and uneven gaits can be visible on the shoes.

How we protect our feet is influenced by the environment (hot, cold, stony, soft), the materials available (leather, plants, beads, quills), and tradition. Tradition guides whether people wear sandals or leather footwear, as well as how they decorate them, but tradition varies over time as conditions, environmental and social, change.

The style of the shoe also tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration. Beaded moccasins are time-consuming to make, comfortable to wear, and beautiful to behold. Moccasins created for a family member will often reflect the love and commitment of the maker toward the wearer. Some styles of moccasins or sandals were reserved for those with status, wealth, or a special role in society. Footwear reflects the lives of their makers and wearers, offering a window into the past and the present.

This exhibition will feature sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions. The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture has amassed a significant collection of Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and these will be exhibited for the first time in decades. The exhibition will conclude with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses, showing how traditional designs and techniques are now being used to create gorgeous, meaningful shoes in the 21st Century.

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017 and will be on exhibit through the end of 2018.

Curator’s Statement by Maxine McBrinn, PhD.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Footwear is evocative. The shoe tells us if the wearer was a child or an adult, and can often tell us whether they were an adult man or woman, based on size and style. Shoes retain signs of the wearer, showing imprints of toes and heels and repairs made as much-needed or much-loved footwear became ragged. They can also hint at health problems; for example, bunions and uneven gaits can be visible on the shoes.

How we protect our feet is influenced by the environment (hot, cold, stony, soft), the materials available (leather, plants, beads, quills), and tradition. Tradition guides whether people wear sandals or leather footwear, as well as how they decorate them, but tradition varies over time as conditions, environmental and social, change.

The style of the shoe also tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration. Beaded moccasins are time-consuming to make, comfortable to wear, and beautiful to behold. Moccasins created for a family member will often reflect the love and commitment of the maker toward the wearer. Some styles of moccasins or sandals were reserved for those with status, wealth, or a special role in society. Footwear reflects the lives of their makers and wearers, offering a window into the past and the present.

This exhibition will feature sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions. The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture has amassed a significant collection of Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and these will be exhibited for the first time in decades. The exhibition will conclude with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses, showing how traditional designs and techniques are now being used to create gorgeous, meaningful shoes in the 21st Century.

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017 and will be on exhibit through the end of 2018.

Curator’s Statement by Maxine McBrinn, PhD.

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Projectile points are one of the most iconic images of archaeology in the American Southwest. This exhibition focuses on some of the projectile points that are commonly found here in New Mexico from Paleoindian times (13,500 years ago), through the Archaic, and into Puebloan times (1,260 to 110 years ago) as well as some of the exotic points that have come to New Mexico from California and Texas.

The exhibit discusses how archaeologists classify points, why they change through time, and how illegal collection of points can impact the archaeological record.

This exhibit opens on Saturday October 21, 2017 at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology (7 Old Cochiti Road). After that, the exhibit is open to the public Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on holidays.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Projectile points are one of the most iconic images of archaeology in the American Southwest. This exhibition focuses on some of the projectile points that are commonly found here in New Mexico from Paleoindian times (13,500 years ago), through the Archaic, and into Puebloan times (1,260 to 110 years ago) as well as some of the exotic points that have come to New Mexico from California and Texas.

The exhibit discusses how archaeologists classify points, why they change through time, and how illegal collection of points can impact the archaeological record.

This exhibit opens on Saturday October 21, 2017 at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology (7 Old Cochiti Road). After that, the exhibit is open to the public Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on holidays.

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Drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive collection, Horizons shows the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and forms that visual creative expression took here in the 20th century. Featured artists include Robert Henri, Marsden Hartley, John Sloan, Georgia O’Keeffe, Bert Greer Phillips, James Stovall Morris, Victor Higgins, Awa Tsireh, Maria Martinez, Fritz Scholder, Alfred Morang, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, and Gustave Baumann, among many others.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive collection, Horizons shows the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and forms that visual creative expression took here in the 20th century. Featured artists include Robert Henri, Marsden Hartley, John Sloan, Georgia O’Keeffe, Bert Greer Phillips, James Stovall Morris, Victor Higgins, Awa Tsireh, Maria Martinez, Fritz Scholder, Alfred Morang, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, and Gustave Baumann, among many others.

[5] =>

Drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive collection, Horizons shows the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and forms that visual creative expression took in the 20th century, and combines to show the heart of a land that became a major center for artistic expression in a remarkable period of human history.

Experience for yourself some the greatest artists who lived and worked in New Mexico in the last century: Robert Henri, Marsden Hartley, John Sloan, Georgia O’Keeffe, Bert Geer Phillips, James Stovall Morris, Victor Higgins, Awa Tsireh, Maria Martinez, Fritz Scholder, Alfred Morang, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, and Gustave Baumann, among many others.

With a contemporary focus since the beginning, the New Mexico Museum of Art has been a progressive advocate for the arts over the past hundred years. Focusing on the museum’s historic collection, Horizons honors our institution’s history as a locus for creativity. This exhibition, including paintings, drawings, prints, and furniture, highlights the impact of the museum in creating an artistic identity for the state.

Major themes will include the founding of the museum, Native arts, a spotlight on Gustave Baumann, 20th century art and community, furniture design in New Mexico, and a selection of work voted on by visitors.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive collection, Horizons shows the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and forms that visual creative expression took in the 20th century, and combines to show the heart of a land that became a major center for artistic expression in a remarkable period of human history.

Experience for yourself some the greatest artists who lived and worked in New Mexico in the last century: Robert Henri, Marsden Hartley, John Sloan, Georgia O’Keeffe, Bert Geer Phillips, James Stovall Morris, Victor Higgins, Awa Tsireh, Maria Martinez, Fritz Scholder, Alfred Morang, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, and Gustave Baumann, among many others.

With a contemporary focus since the beginning, the New Mexico Museum of Art has been a progressive advocate for the arts over the past hundred years. Focusing on the museum’s historic collection, Horizons honors our institution’s history as a locus for creativity. This exhibition, including paintings, drawings, prints, and furniture, highlights the impact of the museum in creating an artistic identity for the state.

Major themes will include the founding of the museum, Native arts, a spotlight on Gustave Baumann, 20th century art and community, furniture design in New Mexico, and a selection of work voted on by visitors.

[6] => www.nmartmuseum.org [eventURL] => www.nmartmuseum.org [7] => 3416_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3416_thumb.jpg [8] => 2017-11-25 [eventStartDate] => 2017-11-25 [9] => 2018-11-25 [eventEndDate] => 2018-11-25 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 3 [instID] => 3 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2017-11-27 08:17:37 [eventUpdated] => 2017-11-27 08:17:37 [17] => 3416_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3416_1200.jpg [18] => 3 [19] => New Mexico Museum of Art [instName] => New Mexico Museum of Art [20] => 3.jpg [instFileName] => 3.jpg [urlSlug] => horizons-people-plac ) [19] => Array ( [0] => 3417 [eventID] => 3417 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Shifting Light : Photographic Perspectives [eventTitle] => Shifting Light : Photographic Perspectives [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Using portraits and oral histories, the show introduces some of the personalities in New Mexico’s twentieth-century photography scene, including Laura Gilpin, Ansel Adams, Thomas Barrow, Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas, among many.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Using portraits and oral histories, the show introduces some of the personalities in New Mexico’s twentieth-century photography scene, including Laura Gilpin, Ansel Adams, Thomas Barrow, Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas, among many.

[5] =>

Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Organized into the broad categories of land and place, culture and identity, community and interconnection, and vision and creativity, the exhibition juxtaposes photographs in ways that amplify their meanings and suggest new narratives. Ansel Adams’ famous 1940 photograph Moonrise, Hernandez is paired with a 1975 landscape by Thomas Barrow from his series Cancellations, while Alfred Stieglitz’s 1918 portrait of Georgia O’Keeffe keeps company with images by Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas.

Using portraits and oral histories, the show introduces some of the personalities in New Mexico’s twentieth-century photography scene, such as artist Laura Gilpin and curator Beaumont Newhall. Collectors, another integral part of the photography community, are represented by a changing selection of promised gifts that are pledged as future additions to the museum’s collection. Visitors are invited to write or draw their own memories, favorite photographs, and other responses to the show. Vintage exhibition announcements, brochures, and publications tell a complementary story of photography’s growing prominence at the museum from the mid-1920s to the present.

An electronic component begins in January 2018, when a group of twenty artists will post images inspired by the exhibition themes to the museum’s Instagram site on alternating weeks.

See Curator of Photography Katherine Ware’s article about the museum’s early history of exhibiting photography, published in Winter 2017 issue of the Museum of New Mexico’s journal, El Palacio.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Organized into the broad categories of land and place, culture and identity, community and interconnection, and vision and creativity, the exhibition juxtaposes photographs in ways that amplify their meanings and suggest new narratives. Ansel Adams’ famous 1940 photograph Moonrise, Hernandez is paired with a 1975 landscape by Thomas Barrow from his series Cancellations, while Alfred Stieglitz’s 1918 portrait of Georgia O’Keeffe keeps company with images by Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas.

Using portraits and oral histories, the show introduces some of the personalities in New Mexico’s twentieth-century photography scene, such as artist Laura Gilpin and curator Beaumont Newhall. Collectors, another integral part of the photography community, are represented by a changing selection of promised gifts that are pledged as future additions to the museum’s collection. Visitors are invited to write or draw their own memories, favorite photographs, and other responses to the show. Vintage exhibition announcements, brochures, and publications tell a complementary story of photography’s growing prominence at the museum from the mid-1920s to the present.

An electronic component begins in January 2018, when a group of twenty artists will post images inspired by the exhibition themes to the museum’s Instagram site on alternating weeks.

See Curator of Photography Katherine Ware’s article about the museum’s early history of exhibiting photography, published in Winter 2017 issue of the Museum of New Mexico’s journal, El Palacio.

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This exhibition explores the new directions taken by current Peruvian folk artists during the recent decades of social and political upheaval and economic change. The exhibition will highlight the biographies and social histories of contemporary artists along with examples of work that preserve family tradition, reimagine older artforms, reclaim pre-Columbian techniques and styles, and forge new directions for arte popular in the 21st century.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

This exhibition explores the new directions taken by current Peruvian folk artists during the recent decades of social and political upheaval and economic change. The exhibition will highlight the biographies and social histories of contemporary artists along with examples of work that preserve family tradition, reimagine older artforms, reclaim pre-Columbian techniques and styles, and forge new directions for arte popular in the 21st century.

[5] =>

The past forty years have been a time of tremendous change in the Andes, beginning with the Agrarian Reform of 1969 that broke up the large haciendas; a twenty-year internal armed conflict with the Shining Path that engulfed the 1980’s and 1990’s and claimed nearly 70,000 lives; economic swings, rapid development, the recent large investment in preserving archaeological heritage and the current booming tourism industry. 

All of these forces have all shaped the lives of artists and informed the art they create.  Crafting Memory visits a series of contemporary folk artists in Peru and places their work within this larger framework of Peruvian history and social change. The exhibition will explore the many routes through which craft and folk arts are learned and practiced, including multigenerational crafting families, self-taught artisans, and others who came to folk arts as a means of economic survival during the time of violence.  The show includes a third generation silversmith reviving the art of tupus or shawl stick pins that were worn during the Inca Empire; the art of war orphans from the 1980’s who were trained in traditional arts to give hope in dark times; and a collective of young artists in Lima using the medium of silk screening to promote conversations between rural highland and jungle communities with their counterpart migrant neighborhoods in the city, celebrating their shared arts, culture, and customs and emphasizing the value of the handmade, and the ideas, values, and aesthetics that arise from Cultura Popular - common people and everyday life.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The past forty years have been a time of tremendous change in the Andes, beginning with the Agrarian Reform of 1969 that broke up the large haciendas; a twenty-year internal armed conflict with the Shining Path that engulfed the 1980’s and 1990’s and claimed nearly 70,000 lives; economic swings, rapid development, the recent large investment in preserving archaeological heritage and the current booming tourism industry. 

All of these forces have all shaped the lives of artists and informed the art they create.  Crafting Memory visits a series of contemporary folk artists in Peru and places their work within this larger framework of Peruvian history and social change. The exhibition will explore the many routes through which craft and folk arts are learned and practiced, including multigenerational crafting families, self-taught artisans, and others who came to folk arts as a means of economic survival during the time of violence.  The show includes a third generation silversmith reviving the art of tupus or shawl stick pins that were worn during the Inca Empire; the art of war orphans from the 1980’s who were trained in traditional arts to give hope in dark times; and a collective of young artists in Lima using the medium of silk screening to promote conversations between rural highland and jungle communities with their counterpart migrant neighborhoods in the city, celebrating their shared arts, culture, and customs and emphasizing the value of the handmade, and the ideas, values, and aesthetics that arise from Cultura Popular - common people and everyday life.

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The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, hunting and horse gear.

These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, hunting and horse gear.

These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

[5] =>

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, hunting and horse gear.

These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

[eventFullDescription] =>

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, hunting and horse gear.

These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

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Da Vinci—The Genius opens at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science in Albuquerque at 9am on Saturday, February 10, 2018.  This world class exhibition from Grande Exhibitions remains on display at the Museum daily from 9am-5pm through July 29, 2018.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Da Vinci—The Genius opens at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science in Albuquerque at 9am on Saturday, February 10, 2018.  This world class exhibition from Grande Exhibitions remains on display at the Museum daily from 9am-5pm through July 29, 2018.

[5] =>

Da Vinci—The Genius opens at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science in Albuquerque at 9am on Saturday, February 10, 2018.  This world class exhibition from Grande Exhibitions remains on display at the Museum daily from 9am-5pm through July 29, 2018.

Da Vinci – The Genius demonstrates the full scope of Leonardo da Vinci’s remarkable genius as an inventor, artist, anatomist, sculptor, engineer, musician and architect. Guests will enjoy many unique pieces including life-size machine inventions, entertaining animations of da Vinci’s most notable Renaissance works and an eye-opening, in-depth analysis of his most famous piece, “Mona Lisa.” Visitors will be able to push, pull, crank and interact with many of these exhibits for a hands-on understanding of the scientific principles behind them.

Created with the assistance of the Museo Leonardo da Vinci – Rome, Italy, and many experts in Italy and France, Da Vinci – The Genius celebrates one of the most revered and dynamic minds of all time. The exhibition features 17 compelling themed areas of da Vinci’s work, offering visitors an unmatched look inside the mind of the ultimate Renaissance man who laid the groundwork for some of modern society’s most impactful inventions such as the helicopter, airplane, automobile, submarine, parachute and bicycle.

For more information about Da Vinci—The Genius: http://www.nmnaturalhistory.org/exhibits/temporary-exhibits/da-vinci-genius

Doors open to the public on February 10, 2018.  Prices are $22 per ticket.  For Ticket information: http://www.nmnaturalhistory.org/exhibits/temporary-exhibits/da-vinci-genius

 

 

About the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science: http://www.nmnaturalhistory.org. Established in 1986, the mission of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science is to preserve and interpret the distinctive natural and scientific heritage of our state through extraordinary collections, research, exhibits and programs designed to ignite a passion for lifelong learning. The NMMNHS offers exhibits, exhibitions, programs, and workshops in Paleontology, Geoscience, Bioscience, Earth Science, Natural Science, Gemology, is the Southwest’s largest repository for dinosaur fossils, and includes a Planetarium and a DynaTheater. A division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, the Museum is open 7 days a week, from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. 1801 Mountain Road NW, northeast of Historic Old Town Plaza, Albuquerque, NM 87104, (505) 841-2800.  Events, news releases and images about activities at the Museum of Natural History and Science and other in divisions of the Department of Cultural Affairs can be accessed at media.newmexicoculture.org.

 

 

ABOUT GRANDE EXHIBITIONS:

Creators and promoters of Da Vinci The Genius, who have researched, sourced and interpreted much of what is contained in the exhibition. 

 

Grande Exhibitions specializes in the creation, design, production, promotion and installation of large-scale international traveling exhibitions and permanent exhibition experiences of broad cultural appeal, which are engaging, entertaining and educational.

 

Grande Exhibitions conceptualizes exhibition experiences of timeless brand appeal and transforms them into visually and technically stunning exhibit masterpieces, ready to tour internationally. Our collection of exhibitions has been hosted in over 90 cities across six continents, to more than 8 million people.

 

Grande Exhibitions operates from its head office in Melbourne, Australia, with satellite offices in London, UK, Atlanta, USA, and Santiago, Chile. Grande Exhibitions also owns and operates Museo Leonardo da Vinci – a permanent museum in a prestigious central location in Rome, Italy.

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

Da Vinci—The Genius opens at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science in Albuquerque at 9am on Saturday, February 10, 2018.  This world class exhibition from Grande Exhibitions remains on display at the Museum daily from 9am-5pm through July 29, 2018.

Da Vinci – The Genius demonstrates the full scope of Leonardo da Vinci’s remarkable genius as an inventor, artist, anatomist, sculptor, engineer, musician and architect. Guests will enjoy many unique pieces including life-size machine inventions, entertaining animations of da Vinci’s most notable Renaissance works and an eye-opening, in-depth analysis of his most famous piece, “Mona Lisa.” Visitors will be able to push, pull, crank and interact with many of these exhibits for a hands-on understanding of the scientific principles behind them.

Created with the assistance of the Museo Leonardo da Vinci – Rome, Italy, and many experts in Italy and France, Da Vinci – The Genius celebrates one of the most revered and dynamic minds of all time. The exhibition features 17 compelling themed areas of da Vinci’s work, offering visitors an unmatched look inside the mind of the ultimate Renaissance man who laid the groundwork for some of modern society’s most impactful inventions such as the helicopter, airplane, automobile, submarine, parachute and bicycle.

For more information about Da Vinci—The Genius: http://www.nmnaturalhistory.org/exhibits/temporary-exhibits/da-vinci-genius

Doors open to the public on February 10, 2018.  Prices are $22 per ticket.  For Ticket information: http://www.nmnaturalhistory.org/exhibits/temporary-exhibits/da-vinci-genius

 

 

About the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science: http://www.nmnaturalhistory.org. Established in 1986, the mission of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science is to preserve and interpret the distinctive natural and scientific heritage of our state through extraordinary collections, research, exhibits and programs designed to ignite a passion for lifelong learning. The NMMNHS offers exhibits, exhibitions, programs, and workshops in Paleontology, Geoscience, Bioscience, Earth Science, Natural Science, Gemology, is the Southwest’s largest repository for dinosaur fossils, and includes a Planetarium and a DynaTheater. A division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, the Museum is open 7 days a week, from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. 1801 Mountain Road NW, northeast of Historic Old Town Plaza, Albuquerque, NM 87104, (505) 841-2800.  Events, news releases and images about activities at the Museum of Natural History and Science and other in divisions of the Department of Cultural Affairs can be accessed at media.newmexicoculture.org.

 

 

ABOUT GRANDE EXHIBITIONS:

Creators and promoters of Da Vinci The Genius, who have researched, sourced and interpreted much of what is contained in the exhibition. 

 

Grande Exhibitions specializes in the creation, design, production, promotion and installation of large-scale international traveling exhibitions and permanent exhibition experiences of broad cultural appeal, which are engaging, entertaining and educational.

 

Grande Exhibitions conceptualizes exhibition experiences of timeless brand appeal and transforms them into visually and technically stunning exhibit masterpieces, ready to tour internationally. Our collection of exhibitions has been hosted in over 90 cities across six continents, to more than 8 million people.

 

Grande Exhibitions operates from its head office in Melbourne, Australia, with satellite offices in London, UK, Atlanta, USA, and Santiago, Chile. Grande Exhibitions also owns and operates Museo Leonardo da Vinci – a permanent museum in a prestigious central location in Rome, Italy.

 

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La Ultima Exhibición, curated by Augustine Romero, features visual interpretations of Rudolfo Anaya’s celebrated book, Bless Me, Ultima (1972)-a portrait of life in rural New Mexico as seen through the eyes of a young boy during World War II. 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

La Ultima Exhibición, curated by Augustine Romero, features visual interpretations of Rudolfo Anaya’s celebrated book, Bless Me, Ultima (1972)-a portrait of life in rural New Mexico as seen through the eyes of a young boy during World War II. 

[5] =>

La Ultima Exhibición, curated by Augustine Romero, features visual interpretations of Rudolfo Anaya’s celebrated book, Bless Me, Ultima (1972)-a portrait of life in rural New Mexico as seen through the eyes of a young boy during World War II. Anaya tells of the spiritual healer, Ultima, as she guides young Antonio on a magical and moral journey in this novel that has inspired artists for decades. Romero curated a previous iteration of this exhibition in 2006 at the South Broadway Cultural Center and the NHCC Art Museum is thrilled to host the re-imagined version twelve years later.

Featured artists include: Jesús ” Cimi” Alvarado, George C’de Baca, Sylvia Ortiz Domney, Christian Michael Gallegos, Roberto Gallegos, Eric Garcia, Kristina Gonzales, Nacho Jaramillo, Al Na’ir Lara, Chisim Bernal Lujan, Oscar Lozoya, Chris Ray Melendez, El Moisés, Derrick Montez, Paloma Paz Nava, Gabriel Luis Powers, Chris Rivera, Rebecca H. Hernandez Rosser, and Catalina Salinas.

Augustine Romero is an acclaimed visual artist and the curator of the South Broadway Cultural Center and the Kimo Theater for the City of Albuquerque.

[eventFullDescription] =>

La Ultima Exhibición, curated by Augustine Romero, features visual interpretations of Rudolfo Anaya’s celebrated book, Bless Me, Ultima (1972)-a portrait of life in rural New Mexico as seen through the eyes of a young boy during World War II. Anaya tells of the spiritual healer, Ultima, as she guides young Antonio on a magical and moral journey in this novel that has inspired artists for decades. Romero curated a previous iteration of this exhibition in 2006 at the South Broadway Cultural Center and the NHCC Art Museum is thrilled to host the re-imagined version twelve years later.

Featured artists include: Jesús ” Cimi” Alvarado, George C’de Baca, Sylvia Ortiz Domney, Christian Michael Gallegos, Roberto Gallegos, Eric Garcia, Kristina Gonzales, Nacho Jaramillo, Al Na’ir Lara, Chisim Bernal Lujan, Oscar Lozoya, Chris Ray Melendez, El Moisés, Derrick Montez, Paloma Paz Nava, Gabriel Luis Powers, Chris Rivera, Rebecca H. Hernandez Rosser, and Catalina Salinas.

Augustine Romero is an acclaimed visual artist and the curator of the South Broadway Cultural Center and the Kimo Theater for the City of Albuquerque.

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Before radio and television, when making music at home was the evening’s entertainment and playing the piano was considered an essential talent among the middle class, sheet music was the music consumer’s gateway to the world.”  The New Mexico History Museum celebrates this era with sheet music of popular songs about the State of New Mexico, dating from the mid-19th through the mid-20th centuries, in the new exhibition The Land That Enchants Me So. The show spotlights graphically striking sheet-music covers published from 1840s through about 1960, along with other printed materials, sound recordings, and memorabilia relating to New Mexico and its musical life.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Before radio and television, when making music at home was the evening’s entertainment and playing the piano was considered an essential talent among the middle class, sheet music was the music consumer’s gateway to the world.”  The New Mexico History Museum celebrates this era with sheet music of popular songs about the State of New Mexico, dating from the mid-19th through the mid-20th centuries, in the new exhibition The Land That Enchants Me So. The show spotlights graphically striking sheet-music covers published from 1840s through about 1960, along with other printed materials, sound recordings, and memorabilia relating to New Mexico and its musical life.

[5] =>

Before radio and television, when making music at home was the evening’s entertainment and playing the piano was considered an essential talent among the middle class, sheet music was the music consumer’s gateway to the world.”  The New Mexico History Museum celebrates this era with sheet music of popular songs about the State of New Mexico, dating from the mid-19th through the mid-20th centuries, in the new exhibition The Land That Enchants Me So. The show spotlights graphically striking sheet-music covers published from 1840s through about 1960, along with other printed materials, sound recordings, and memorabilia relating to New Mexico and its musical life.

“At a time before everywhere in America was pretty much like everywhere else, songs often gave voice to civic pride. During the 19th and early-20th centuries, people felt that their own home town was a place worthy of singing about,” said James M. Keller, who co-curated the exhibition with Meredith Davidson, the Museum’s Curator of Southwest Collections. “In the 19th and early-20th centuries, publishers understood that potential sheet-music buyers judged pieces of music—like books—by their covers. And so, they accordingly lavished care on the creation of vivid, original art and design for the sheet music they issued.”

The decorative sheet music in the exhibit is drawn from the private collection assembled over the past three decades by James M. Keller, whose collection focuses on historical popular music from the era of vaudeville and Tin Pan Alley. The guest co-curator of the show, he is known to New Mexico’s music-lovers through his work as a staff critic at Pasatiempo/The Santa Fe New Mexican. He is also the Program Annotator of the New York Philharmonic, where he has served since 1995 and occupies an endowed chair, and (since 2000) of the San Francisco Symphony.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Before radio and television, when making music at home was the evening’s entertainment and playing the piano was considered an essential talent among the middle class, sheet music was the music consumer’s gateway to the world.”  The New Mexico History Museum celebrates this era with sheet music of popular songs about the State of New Mexico, dating from the mid-19th through the mid-20th centuries, in the new exhibition The Land That Enchants Me So. The show spotlights graphically striking sheet-music covers published from 1840s through about 1960, along with other printed materials, sound recordings, and memorabilia relating to New Mexico and its musical life.

“At a time before everywhere in America was pretty much like everywhere else, songs often gave voice to civic pride. During the 19th and early-20th centuries, people felt that their own home town was a place worthy of singing about,” said James M. Keller, who co-curated the exhibition with Meredith Davidson, the Museum’s Curator of Southwest Collections. “In the 19th and early-20th centuries, publishers understood that potential sheet-music buyers judged pieces of music—like books—by their covers. And so, they accordingly lavished care on the creation of vivid, original art and design for the sheet music they issued.”

The decorative sheet music in the exhibit is drawn from the private collection assembled over the past three decades by James M. Keller, whose collection focuses on historical popular music from the era of vaudeville and Tin Pan Alley. The guest co-curator of the show, he is known to New Mexico’s music-lovers through his work as a staff critic at Pasatiempo/The Santa Fe New Mexican. He is also the Program Annotator of the New York Philharmonic, where he has served since 1995 and occupies an endowed chair, and (since 2000) of the San Francisco Symphony.

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MIAC is happy to announce Maria Samora: Master of Elegance, an exhibition that showcases this year’s Museum of Indian Arts & Culture Living Treasure and Native Treasurers Featured Artist.

Samora (Taos Pueblo) is known for her minimalist lines, interdisciplinary approach, and modern designs.

She began apprenticing with goldsmith and master gem cutter Phil Poirer in 1998 and went on to work with him for 15 years. Since striking out on her own in 2005, her jewelry has become known for the simplicity of its design, textured metals, and combinations of both gold and silver. Stones include traditional turquoise and unexpected choices such as diamonds, guava moonstone, and African opal.

The metalwork Samora has learned to incorporate are rooted in Etruscan, Greek, Egyptian, Syrian, and even Korean designs.

Samora’s work will remain on display in MIAC’s Diker Gallery through February of 2019.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

MIAC is happy to announce Maria Samora: Master of Elegance, an exhibition that showcases this year’s Museum of Indian Arts & Culture Living Treasure and Native Treasurers Featured Artist.

Samora (Taos Pueblo) is known for her minimalist lines, interdisciplinary approach, and modern designs.

She began apprenticing with goldsmith and master gem cutter Phil Poirer in 1998 and went on to work with him for 15 years. Since striking out on her own in 2005, her jewelry has become known for the simplicity of its design, textured metals, and combinations of both gold and silver. Stones include traditional turquoise and unexpected choices such as diamonds, guava moonstone, and African opal.

The metalwork Samora has learned to incorporate are rooted in Etruscan, Greek, Egyptian, Syrian, and even Korean designs.

Samora’s work will remain on display in MIAC’s Diker Gallery through February of 2019.

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Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of people far distant. 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of people far distant. 

[5] =>

Glass beads are the ultimate migrants.  Where they start out is seldom where they end up.  No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

This exhibition is about what happens to these beads when they arrive at their final destination, whether it be the African continent (Botswana, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa), to Borneo, to Burma, to India, Native North America to Latin America (Mexico, Bolivia to Ecuador).  However, this exhibit is not actually about beads, rather it is about the working beads resulting in Beadwork, and what a collective of beads in a garment or an object reveals about the intentions of its makers or users.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Glass beads are the ultimate migrants.  Where they start out is seldom where they end up.  No matter where they originate, the locale that uses them makes them into something specific to their own world view.

This exhibition is about what happens to these beads when they arrive at their final destination, whether it be the African continent (Botswana, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa), to Borneo, to Burma, to India, Native North America to Latin America (Mexico, Bolivia to Ecuador).  However, this exhibit is not actually about beads, rather it is about the working beads resulting in Beadwork, and what a collective of beads in a garment or an object reveals about the intentions of its makers or users.

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Presented by The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens and the New Mexico Museum of Art

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Presented by The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens and the New Mexico Museum of Art

[5] =>

Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking, brought from The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, showcases the American artist’s sketchbooks, notebooks, inventories, and vibrant color swatches to illuminate the systematic  process he used to create his lively hard-edge geometric paintings. The presentation in New Mexico, where the artist lived from 1968 until his death in 2009, will be expanded by a dozen additional works from New Mexico Museum of Art’s collection.

 Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking at New Mexico Museum of Art will feature over 60 objects, pairing items from Hammersley’s archives (a recent gift to the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles) with seven paintings, including the New Mexico Museum of Art’s recently conserved Couplet #15,  1965 (1968), The Huntington’s See saw #3, 1966, and dozens of other works, including lithographs, silkscreens, and  computer drawings from the collections of The Huntington, New Mexico Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Palm Springs Art Museum, and Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

The museum has had a longstanding relationship with Frederick, and holds a comprehensive collection of his artwork, from early student work, his computer drawings and punch cards, prime examples of his fully mature paintings, as well as archive materials and color studies. This carefully researched, imaginative show will be particularly well received here in New Mexico where the artist lived for the last four decades of his life. Highlights of the Hammersley archives include his notebooks and sketchbooks, in which the artist developed compositions over a period of decades. In these books, he generally used a two-stage process, first composing postage stamp-sized images—sketched out in pencil, colored pencil, or ballpoint pen—then selecting compositions to execute on a larger scale, sometimes in oil paint. “These sketchbooks served as a forum for exploration and a wellspring from which he drew throughout his long career,” said James Glisson, Bradford and Christine Mishler Associate Curator of American Art at The Huntington and co-curator of the exhibition. “It is like peeking over his shoulder to see him at work, altering a color or two, adding or subtracting a line, then moving on.”  

“Painting Books”

Frederick Hammersley (1919-2009), who lived in Los Angeles until 1968, entered the spotlight in 1959 as one of the artists in the international exhibition “Four Abstract Classicists,” along with Karl Benjamin, Lorser Feitelson, and John McLaughlin.  He was unique among his peers in that the elegant simplicity of his paintings stemmed from a rigorous process of refinement that he tracked in extreme detail. His “Painting Books,” two of which are on view in the exhibition, contain dated entries for every step of the painting process, from stretching a canvas and applying multiple layers of paint to varnishing and touching up. These invaluable records outline the process and materials he used in more than 150 geometric paintings. Such a level of record-keeping was a boon for exhibition co-curator Alan Phenix, scientist at the Getty Conservation Institute, whose essay in the exhibition catalog describes Hammersley’s paintings from the technical perspective. Phenix observes, “I doubt there exists anywhere such a large group of paintings that is so fully described from the material and technical point of view.”

Experimental lithographs

“Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking” also includes 45 of the experimental lithographs made in 1949, a pivotal moment when Hammersley had reached an impasse with traditional painting and turned to the exacting medium of stone lithography. He taught himself the complex lithography process, pulling prints on the weekends at the Jepson Art School in Los Angeles, where he was teaching. Numbering in the hundreds, these prints each measure 3by-3inches, and consist of a 4-by-4 grid with 16 squares.

“Computer drawings”  

In 1968, Hammersley reached another “dry spell” in his painting activity and moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico, to teach at the University of New Mexico. Shortly after arriving there, he learned Art1, a computer program written by Richard Williams and among the first programs designed for visual artists. Using punch cards, a then-state-of-the-art IBM 360/40 computer, and a tractor-fed 1403 IBM line printer, Hammersley made hundreds of “computer drawings.”

While the interlude with computer art did not obviously  change how Hammersley approached his geometric paintings, the Painting Book entries became much more detailed. Glisson speculates  that the artist’s step-by-step recording of  his paintings  was a result of mastering Art1’s complicated instructions for punching holes in data cards to generate shapes and patterns. “Just as chess and checkers have rules but the rules don’t dictate how a game unfolds and ends,” Glisson said, “Hammersley’s rules and systems didn’t predetermine the outcome of his work. For Hammersley, the concept of “painting without thinking” was a grey area between pre-determination and pure chance where he felt unburdened enough to explore and invent.”

Exhibition catalog

The Huntington has published Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking (ISBN 978-0-9986817-1-9), a boldly illustrated catalog accompanying the exhibition and edited by James Glisson, Bradford and Christine Mishler Associate Curator of American Art at The Huntington, with contributions from Alan Phenix, scientist at the Getty Conservation Institute, Kathleen Shields, Executive Director at the Frederick Hammersley Foundation, and Nancy Zastudil, Administrative Director at the Frederick Hammersley Foundation. Distributed internationally by DAP and retailing for $35, the catalog has 120 pages and 75 illustrations. Available at thehuntingtonstore.org.

Credit line The presentation of Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking at The Huntington received generous support from the Frederick Hammersley Foundation and the Susan and Stephen Chandler Endowment for Exhibitions of American Art. The exhibition catalog received generous support from the Frederick Hammersley Foundation.

About The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution serving scholars and the general public. More information about The Huntington can be found online at www.huntington.org.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking, brought from The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, showcases the American artist’s sketchbooks, notebooks, inventories, and vibrant color swatches to illuminate the systematic  process he used to create his lively hard-edge geometric paintings. The presentation in New Mexico, where the artist lived from 1968 until his death in 2009, will be expanded by a dozen additional works from New Mexico Museum of Art’s collection.

 Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking at New Mexico Museum of Art will feature over 60 objects, pairing items from Hammersley’s archives (a recent gift to the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles) with seven paintings, including the New Mexico Museum of Art’s recently conserved Couplet #15,  1965 (1968), The Huntington’s See saw #3, 1966, and dozens of other works, including lithographs, silkscreens, and  computer drawings from the collections of The Huntington, New Mexico Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Palm Springs Art Museum, and Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

The museum has had a longstanding relationship with Frederick, and holds a comprehensive collection of his artwork, from early student work, his computer drawings and punch cards, prime examples of his fully mature paintings, as well as archive materials and color studies. This carefully researched, imaginative show will be particularly well received here in New Mexico where the artist lived for the last four decades of his life. Highlights of the Hammersley archives include his notebooks and sketchbooks, in which the artist developed compositions over a period of decades. In these books, he generally used a two-stage process, first composing postage stamp-sized images—sketched out in pencil, colored pencil, or ballpoint pen—then selecting compositions to execute on a larger scale, sometimes in oil paint. “These sketchbooks served as a forum for exploration and a wellspring from which he drew throughout his long career,” said James Glisson, Bradford and Christine Mishler Associate Curator of American Art at The Huntington and co-curator of the exhibition. “It is like peeking over his shoulder to see him at work, altering a color or two, adding or subtracting a line, then moving on.”  

“Painting Books”

Frederick Hammersley (1919-2009), who lived in Los Angeles until 1968, entered the spotlight in 1959 as one of the artists in the international exhibition “Four Abstract Classicists,” along with Karl Benjamin, Lorser Feitelson, and John McLaughlin.  He was unique among his peers in that the elegant simplicity of his paintings stemmed from a rigorous process of refinement that he tracked in extreme detail. His “Painting Books,” two of which are on view in the exhibition, contain dated entries for every step of the painting process, from stretching a canvas and applying multiple layers of paint to varnishing and touching up. These invaluable records outline the process and materials he used in more than 150 geometric paintings. Such a level of record-keeping was a boon for exhibition co-curator Alan Phenix, scientist at the Getty Conservation Institute, whose essay in the exhibition catalog describes Hammersley’s paintings from the technical perspective. Phenix observes, “I doubt there exists anywhere such a large group of paintings that is so fully described from the material and technical point of view.”

Experimental lithographs

“Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking” also includes 45 of the experimental lithographs made in 1949, a pivotal moment when Hammersley had reached an impasse with traditional painting and turned to the exacting medium of stone lithography. He taught himself the complex lithography process, pulling prints on the weekends at the Jepson Art School in Los Angeles, where he was teaching. Numbering in the hundreds, these prints each measure 3by-3inches, and consist of a 4-by-4 grid with 16 squares.

“Computer drawings”  

In 1968, Hammersley reached another “dry spell” in his painting activity and moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico, to teach at the University of New Mexico. Shortly after arriving there, he learned Art1, a computer program written by Richard Williams and among the first programs designed for visual artists. Using punch cards, a then-state-of-the-art IBM 360/40 computer, and a tractor-fed 1403 IBM line printer, Hammersley made hundreds of “computer drawings.”

While the interlude with computer art did not obviously  change how Hammersley approached his geometric paintings, the Painting Book entries became much more detailed. Glisson speculates  that the artist’s step-by-step recording of  his paintings  was a result of mastering Art1’s complicated instructions for punching holes in data cards to generate shapes and patterns. “Just as chess and checkers have rules but the rules don’t dictate how a game unfolds and ends,” Glisson said, “Hammersley’s rules and systems didn’t predetermine the outcome of his work. For Hammersley, the concept of “painting without thinking” was a grey area between pre-determination and pure chance where he felt unburdened enough to explore and invent.”

Exhibition catalog

The Huntington has published Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking (ISBN 978-0-9986817-1-9), a boldly illustrated catalog accompanying the exhibition and edited by James Glisson, Bradford and Christine Mishler Associate Curator of American Art at The Huntington, with contributions from Alan Phenix, scientist at the Getty Conservation Institute, Kathleen Shields, Executive Director at the Frederick Hammersley Foundation, and Nancy Zastudil, Administrative Director at the Frederick Hammersley Foundation. Distributed internationally by DAP and retailing for $35, the catalog has 120 pages and 75 illustrations. Available at thehuntingtonstore.org.

Credit line The presentation of Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking at The Huntington received generous support from the Frederick Hammersley Foundation and the Susan and Stephen Chandler Endowment for Exhibitions of American Art. The exhibition catalog received generous support from the Frederick Hammersley Foundation.

About The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution serving scholars and the general public. More information about The Huntington can be found online at www.huntington.org.

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A Survey across the late artist’s rich career, drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive holdings and concentrating on his creative process and use of visual storytelling.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

A Survey across the late artist’s rich career, drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive holdings and concentrating on his creative process and use of visual storytelling.

[5] =>

Photographer Patrick Nagatani (1945-2017) didn’t just take pictures, he made pictures. While most art photographs are the result of careful choices about subject, framing, lighting, and other factors, Nagatani went to even greater lengths to get the picture he wanted. With experience working in Hollywood special-effects and an MFA from UCLA, the artist began creating models and constructing scenes specifically for the camera in the mid-1980s.

Nagatani became a leading figure in the directorial style of photography, which not only acknowledges that photographs are fictional but lets viewers in on the joke. Nagatani and his collaborators actively staged scenes for the camera, directing every aspect of production without hiding the strings and seams that held them together. He is known for using humor and exaggerated narratives to draw attention to social issues, particularly the legacy of the atomic bomb. This survey across Nagatani’s rich career, drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive holdings, concentrates on the artist’s creative process and use of visual storytelling.

The show ranges from his large-format Polaroid collaborations with painter Andrée Tracey, for which the artists constructed elaborate and sometimes outlandish narrative scenes with frequent cameo appearances by themselves, as well as students, family, and friends. The exhibition offers a rare opportunity to see two painted backdrops and a papier mâche prop made by Tracey, on loan from the Albuquerque Museum, for the photographs Radioactive Reds and Great Yellow Father. Video clips and label text by some of the artist’s students, friends, and colleagues bring Nagatani’s inventive and theatrical process to life for visitors. Also represented are photographs from series including Chromatherapy, Nuclear Enchantment, Japanese-American Concentration Camps, and Tape-estries, two lithographs, and a set of matchbooks altered by the artist.

Nagatani was a longtime faculty member at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque and a prominent figure in the photography world who touched many lives. He was passionate about his work, intensely creative, and humorous.

The exhibition is presented in conjunction with summer shows of the artist’s work at the Albuquerque Museum and the University of New Mexico Art Museum. Aspects of the show and related programs are in coordination with the New Mexico History Museum exhibition Atomic Histories and the Santa Fe Opera performance of Doctor Atomic

[eventFullDescription] =>

Photographer Patrick Nagatani (1945-2017) didn’t just take pictures, he made pictures. While most art photographs are the result of careful choices about subject, framing, lighting, and other factors, Nagatani went to even greater lengths to get the picture he wanted. With experience working in Hollywood special-effects and an MFA from UCLA, the artist began creating models and constructing scenes specifically for the camera in the mid-1980s.

Nagatani became a leading figure in the directorial style of photography, which not only acknowledges that photographs are fictional but lets viewers in on the joke. Nagatani and his collaborators actively staged scenes for the camera, directing every aspect of production without hiding the strings and seams that held them together. He is known for using humor and exaggerated narratives to draw attention to social issues, particularly the legacy of the atomic bomb. This survey across Nagatani’s rich career, drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive holdings, concentrates on the artist’s creative process and use of visual storytelling.

The show ranges from his large-format Polaroid collaborations with painter Andrée Tracey, for which the artists constructed elaborate and sometimes outlandish narrative scenes with frequent cameo appearances by themselves, as well as students, family, and friends. The exhibition offers a rare opportunity to see two painted backdrops and a papier mâche prop made by Tracey, on loan from the Albuquerque Museum, for the photographs Radioactive Reds and Great Yellow Father. Video clips and label text by some of the artist’s students, friends, and colleagues bring Nagatani’s inventive and theatrical process to life for visitors. Also represented are photographs from series including Chromatherapy, Nuclear Enchantment, Japanese-American Concentration Camps, and Tape-estries, two lithographs, and a set of matchbooks altered by the artist.

Nagatani was a longtime faculty member at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque and a prominent figure in the photography world who touched many lives. He was passionate about his work, intensely creative, and humorous.

The exhibition is presented in conjunction with summer shows of the artist’s work at the Albuquerque Museum and the University of New Mexico Art Museum. Aspects of the show and related programs are in coordination with the New Mexico History Museum exhibition Atomic Histories and the Santa Fe Opera performance of Doctor Atomic

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3710_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3710_thumb.jpg [8] => 2018-05-25 [eventStartDate] => 2018-05-25 [9] => 2018-09-09 [eventEndDate] => 2018-09-09 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 3 [instID] => 3 [15] => 65 [contactID] => 65 [16] => 2018-05-25 13:12:08 [eventUpdated] => 2018-05-25 13:12:08 [17] => 3710_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3710_1200.jpg [18] => 3 [19] => New Mexico Museum of Art [instName] => New Mexico Museum of Art [20] => 3.jpg [instFileName] => 3.jpg [urlSlug] => patrick-nagatani-inv ) [29] => Array ( [0] => 3698 [eventID] => 3698 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection [eventTitle] => What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection [3] => A New Exhibit! [eventSubTitle] => A New Exhibit! [4] =>

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC) periodically features art recently acquired through gifts or purchases. What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection, highlights the collection donated to the Museum by Carol Warren, who was a volunteer in the Collections Department for more than 20 years.

The collection consists of over 200 works of art, including paintings, pottery, jewelry and textiles from some of Santa Fe’s most prominent contemporary artists. A selection of this collection will be on exhibit and will include pieces created by renowned artists such as Tony Abeyta, Tammy Garcia, Dan Namingha, and Jody Naranjo.

The exhibition, co-curated by, C.L. Kieffer Nail, Antonio Chavarria, and Valerie Verzuh, will not only highlight outstanding contemporary artists, but it will also feature multigenerational artists by including work of artists within the same family that have crafted their trade alongside each other.

“By displaying pieces made by related artists, we hope to demonstrate ways in which Native artists inspire each other through instruction as well as how individual artists exhibit their own identity through what is essentially a family practice,” said curator C. L. Kieffer Nail.

In accepting new items, whether they were made yesterday or 12,000 years ago, museum staff consider various issues such as curatorial collecting objectives, gaps in collections, potential future use of the objects such as publication and exhibition, storage limitations and special preservation requirements.

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology collections inspire appreciation for and promote knowledge of the diverse native arts, histories, languages, and cultures of the Greater Southwest. This mission is made possible through the active acquisition of material culture that contributes to an understanding of the peoples that made them.

The creative talents of Native artists in the past, present and future, give purpose to the MIAC. This is why it continues to collect and preserve art and artifacts made by tribal artists from all time periods. It endeavors to educate visitors about ancient yet living Native cultures, and provide Indian artists with examples of their ancestors’ gifts.

The accessioned collections of the museum are made possible by the generosity of donors and the cultivation of such by the Museum of New Mexico Foundation and its affiliated support groups.

 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC) periodically features art recently acquired through gifts or purchases. What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection, highlights the collection donated to the Museum by Carol Warren, who was a volunteer in the Collections Department for more than 20 years.

The collection consists of over 200 works of art, including paintings, pottery, jewelry and textiles from some of Santa Fe’s most prominent contemporary artists. A selection of this collection will be on exhibit and will include pieces created by renowned artists such as Tony Abeyta, Tammy Garcia, Dan Namingha, and Jody Naranjo.

The exhibition, co-curated by, C.L. Kieffer Nail, Antonio Chavarria, and Valerie Verzuh, will not only highlight outstanding contemporary artists, but it will also feature multigenerational artists by including work of artists within the same family that have crafted their trade alongside each other.

“By displaying pieces made by related artists, we hope to demonstrate ways in which Native artists inspire each other through instruction as well as how individual artists exhibit their own identity through what is essentially a family practice,” said curator C. L. Kieffer Nail.

In accepting new items, whether they were made yesterday or 12,000 years ago, museum staff consider various issues such as curatorial collecting objectives, gaps in collections, potential future use of the objects such as publication and exhibition, storage limitations and special preservation requirements.

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology collections inspire appreciation for and promote knowledge of the diverse native arts, histories, languages, and cultures of the Greater Southwest. This mission is made possible through the active acquisition of material culture that contributes to an understanding of the peoples that made them.

The creative talents of Native artists in the past, present and future, give purpose to the MIAC. This is why it continues to collect and preserve art and artifacts made by tribal artists from all time periods. It endeavors to educate visitors about ancient yet living Native cultures, and provide Indian artists with examples of their ancestors’ gifts.

The accessioned collections of the museum are made possible by the generosity of donors and the cultivation of such by the Museum of New Mexico Foundation and its affiliated support groups.

 

[5] => [eventFullDescription] => [6] => [eventURL] => [7] => [eventFileName] => [8] => 2018-06-03 [eventStartDate] => 2018-06-03 [9] => 2019-04-07 [eventEndDate] => 2019-04-07 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 1 [instID] => 1 [15] => 107 [contactID] => 107 [16] => 2018-05-15 15:02:06 [eventUpdated] => 2018-05-15 15:02:06 [17] => [eventBanner] => [18] => 1 [19] => Museum of Indian Arts and Culture [instName] => Museum of Indian Arts and Culture [20] => 1.jpg [instFileName] => 1.jpg [urlSlug] => whats-new-in-new-sel ) [30] => Array ( [0] => 3749 [eventID] => 3749 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Atomic Histories [eventTitle] => Atomic Histories [3] => Remembering New Mexico’s Nuclear Past [eventSubTitle] => Remembering New Mexico’s Nuclear Past [4] =>

The Atomic Histories exhibit explores the most famous events, sometimes little known stories, and inventions born here which impact our lives, and helps to recognize the remarkable contributions of thousands of people involved in writing New Mexico’s Atomic Histories for the last 75 years. 

Curated by Melanie LaBorwit, Educator with the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors.

Photo courtesy of the Los Alamos Historical Society Archives 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

The Atomic Histories exhibit explores the most famous events, sometimes little known stories, and inventions born here which impact our lives, and helps to recognize the remarkable contributions of thousands of people involved in writing New Mexico’s Atomic Histories for the last 75 years. 

Curated by Melanie LaBorwit, Educator with the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors.

Photo courtesy of the Los Alamos Historical Society Archives 

[5] =>

Beginning in World War II with the first research and fabrication of nuclear weapons in Los Alamos for the Manhattan Project and the first atomic bomb test at the Trinity site near Alamogordo, New Mexico’s story is linked with the history of nuclear science and innovation. As soon as the war was over and the Cold War began, two national laboratories were founded in Los Alamos and Albuquerque that advanced the technologies of war and later, would pioneer cutting edge physics, chemistry and other scientific fields. Mines in the Grants Mineral Belt were opened in the western part of the state that unearthed the fuel for both weapons and new sources of energy. Eventually, the state was chosen to be the site of disposal for nuclear waste byproducts at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project in Carlsbad.  A new uranium enrichment plant has opened in Eunice. Old projects ended, and new challenges would emerge, but in the 21st century, New Mexico is at the forefront of our nation’s nuclear scientific endeavors.

This exhibit explores the most famous events, sometimes little known stories, and inventions born here which impact our lives, and helps to recognize the remarkable contributions of thousands of people involved in writing New Mexico’s Atomic Histories for the last 75 years. Two large-scale installations by Meridel Rubenstein are featured in this exhibition.

Curated by Melanie LaBorwit, Educator with the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors.

Photo courtesy of the Los Alamos Historical Society Archives 

[eventFullDescription] =>

Beginning in World War II with the first research and fabrication of nuclear weapons in Los Alamos for the Manhattan Project and the first atomic bomb test at the Trinity site near Alamogordo, New Mexico’s story is linked with the history of nuclear science and innovation. As soon as the war was over and the Cold War began, two national laboratories were founded in Los Alamos and Albuquerque that advanced the technologies of war and later, would pioneer cutting edge physics, chemistry and other scientific fields. Mines in the Grants Mineral Belt were opened in the western part of the state that unearthed the fuel for both weapons and new sources of energy. Eventually, the state was chosen to be the site of disposal for nuclear waste byproducts at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project in Carlsbad.  A new uranium enrichment plant has opened in Eunice. Old projects ended, and new challenges would emerge, but in the 21st century, New Mexico is at the forefront of our nation’s nuclear scientific endeavors.

This exhibit explores the most famous events, sometimes little known stories, and inventions born here which impact our lives, and helps to recognize the remarkable contributions of thousands of people involved in writing New Mexico’s Atomic Histories for the last 75 years. Two large-scale installations by Meridel Rubenstein are featured in this exhibition.

Curated by Melanie LaBorwit, Educator with the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors.

Photo courtesy of the Los Alamos Historical Society Archives 

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3749_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3749_thumb.jpg [8] => 2018-06-03 [eventStartDate] => 2018-06-03 [9] => 2019-05-31 [eventEndDate] => 2019-05-31 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 19 [instID] => 19 [15] => 0 [contactID] => 0 [16] => 2018-07-11 11:01:03 [eventUpdated] => 2018-07-11 11:01:03 [17] => 3749_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3749_1200.jpg [18] => 19 [19] => New Mexico History Museum [instName] => New Mexico History Museum [20] => 19.jpg [instFileName] => 19.jpg [urlSlug] => atomic-histories ) [31] => Array ( [0] => 3655 [eventID] => 3655 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => 2018 NatureScapes Annual Photo Contest Topic: Clouds [eventTitle] => 2018 NatureScapes Annual Photo Contest Topic: Clouds [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science (NMMNHS)  2018 NatureScapes Annual Photo competition – Clouds.

Photographs are submitted to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science through the month August 2018.         

 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science (NMMNHS)  2018 NatureScapes Annual Photo competition – Clouds.

Photographs are submitted to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science through the month August 2018.         

 

[5] =>

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science (NMMNHS)  2018 NatureScapes Annual Photo competition – Clouds.   

Each year the NatureScapes gallery sponsors a photo contest encouraging contestants to examine and understand the New Mexico’s natural beauty. This year’s theme, “clouds” invites photographers to explore and re-discover the nature in the sky. This year’s winning photographs will be hang in the gallery from October 20 through January 19, 2019.

Photographs are judged by local experts and prizes are supported by the NMMNH Foundation. Each year, the Museum hangs 30 photographs; this year’s NatureScapes competition received nearly 100 submissions from photographers across New Mexico. The Museum encourages children to participate with special prizes for students (under 18).

 

[eventFullDescription] =>

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science (NMMNHS)  2018 NatureScapes Annual Photo competition – Clouds.   

Each year the NatureScapes gallery sponsors a photo contest encouraging contestants to examine and understand the New Mexico’s natural beauty. This year’s theme, “clouds” invites photographers to explore and re-discover the nature in the sky. This year’s winning photographs will be hang in the gallery from October 20 through January 19, 2019.

Photographs are judged by local experts and prizes are supported by the NMMNH Foundation. Each year, the Museum hangs 30 photographs; this year’s NatureScapes competition received nearly 100 submissions from photographers across New Mexico. The Museum encourages children to participate with special prizes for students (under 18).

 

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => [eventFileName] => [8] => 2018-10-20 [eventStartDate] => 2018-10-20 [9] => 2019-01-19 [eventEndDate] => 2019-01-19 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 30 [instID] => 30 [15] => 129 [contactID] => 129 [16] => 2018-02-02 10:21:06 [eventUpdated] => 2018-02-02 10:21:06 [17] => [eventBanner] => [18] => 30 [19] => Museum of Natural History and Science [instName] => Museum of Natural History and Science [20] => 30.jpg [instFileName] => 30.jpg [urlSlug] => 2018-naturescapes-an ) [32] => Array ( [0] => 3841 [eventID] => 3841 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => A Gathering of Voices: Folk Art from the Judith Espinar and Tom Dillenberg Collection [eventTitle] => A Gathering of Voices: Folk Art from the Judith Espinar and Tom Dillenberg Collection [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

A Gathering of Voices celebrates the promised gift of the folk art collection of Judith Espinar and Tom Dillenberg. Comprising primarily ceramic traditions from Mexico, Spain, France, Hungary, Morocco, and numerous other countries, the collection also includes rich holdings of New Mexico santos, Latin American retablos, and metalwork, furniture and textiles from around the world. The exhibition brings together the various voices of international cultures and living traditions, through the vision of one collector.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

A Gathering of Voices celebrates the promised gift of the folk art collection of Judith Espinar and Tom Dillenberg. Comprising primarily ceramic traditions from Mexico, Spain, France, Hungary, Morocco, and numerous other countries, the collection also includes rich holdings of New Mexico santos, Latin American retablos, and metalwork, furniture and textiles from around the world. The exhibition brings together the various voices of international cultures and living traditions, through the vision of one collector.

[5] =>

The unique installation of A Gathering of Voices reflects how Espinar has lived with folk art, animating the objects through groupings that guide the viewer to cross-cultural comparisons of certain motifs, forms, or techniques. These “inhabited spaces” are re-created in the gallery, along with deeper investigations of individual artists, their workshops, or the traditions they keep alive.

Judith Espinar was one of the cofounders of the International Folk Art Market, which was established in 2004 and is today the largest event of its kind focused on the work of master folk artists. She previously worked in the fashion industry in New York for more than 30 years, before moving to Santa Fe, where she owned and operated the longtime Santa Fe ceramic store The Clay Angel.

Photo: Addison Doty

[eventFullDescription] =>

The unique installation of A Gathering of Voices reflects how Espinar has lived with folk art, animating the objects through groupings that guide the viewer to cross-cultural comparisons of certain motifs, forms, or techniques. These “inhabited spaces” are re-created in the gallery, along with deeper investigations of individual artists, their workshops, or the traditions they keep alive.

Judith Espinar was one of the cofounders of the International Folk Art Market, which was established in 2004 and is today the largest event of its kind focused on the work of master folk artists. She previously worked in the fashion industry in New York for more than 30 years, before moving to Santa Fe, where she owned and operated the longtime Santa Fe ceramic store The Clay Angel.

Photo: Addison Doty

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3841_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3841_thumb.jpg [8] => 2018-12-16 [eventStartDate] => 2018-12-16 [9] => 2019-08-25 [eventEndDate] => 2019-08-25 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 2 [instID] => 2 [15] => 93 [contactID] => 93 [16] => 2018-07-10 15:10:11 [eventUpdated] => 2018-07-10 15:10:11 [17] => 3841_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3841_1200.jpg [18] => 2 [19] => Museum of International Folk Art [instName] => Museum of International Folk Art [20] => 2.jpg [instFileName] => 2.jpg [urlSlug] => a-gathering-of-voice ) [33] => Array ( [0] => 3815 [eventID] => 3815 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe [eventTitle] => Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Alexander Girard was one of the most influential interior and textile designers of the 20th century. Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe is the first major retrospective on Girard’s work, organized by the Vitra Design Museum in Germany. It opens a door to his creative universe and shows his close relationships with contemporaries such as Charles & Ray Eames, Eero Saarinen, Andy Warhol, Rudi Gernreich, and many others. Featured are Girard’s designs in textiles, furniture, and sculptures, as well as numerous sketches, drawings, and collages never shown before.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Alexander Girard was one of the most influential interior and textile designers of the 20th century. Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe is the first major retrospective on Girard’s work, organized by the Vitra Design Museum in Germany. It opens a door to his creative universe and shows his close relationships with contemporaries such as Charles & Ray Eames, Eero Saarinen, Andy Warhol, Rudi Gernreich, and many others. Featured are Girard’s designs in textiles, furniture, and sculptures, as well as numerous sketches, drawings, and collages never shown before.

[5] =>

 

Girard was also a pivotal figure in the history of the Museum of International Folk Art, donating more than 100,000 objects from his and his wife Susan’s folk art collection, and in 1981 creating the museum’s long-term, beloved exhibition Multiple Visions. Girard’s playful designs attest to a passion for colors, ornamentation, and inspirations from folk art.

Coinciding with this traveling retrospective, the Museum of International Folk Art will enhance the visitor experience of its Girard collection exhibition, Multiple Visions, through interpretive and interactive elements designed for the 21st century.

Photo: Alexander Girard, Tree of Life, 1968. Design for building exterior, HemisFair, San Antonio. Vitra Design Museum.

[eventFullDescription] =>

 

Girard was also a pivotal figure in the history of the Museum of International Folk Art, donating more than 100,000 objects from his and his wife Susan’s folk art collection, and in 1981 creating the museum’s long-term, beloved exhibition Multiple Visions. Girard’s playful designs attest to a passion for colors, ornamentation, and inspirations from folk art.

Coinciding with this traveling retrospective, the Museum of International Folk Art will enhance the visitor experience of its Girard collection exhibition, Multiple Visions, through interpretive and interactive elements designed for the 21st century.

Photo: Alexander Girard, Tree of Life, 1968. Design for building exterior, HemisFair, San Antonio. Vitra Design Museum.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3815_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3815_thumb.jpg [8] => 2019-05-05 [eventStartDate] => 2019-05-05 [9] => 2019-10-27 [eventEndDate] => 2019-10-27 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 2 [instID] => 2 [15] => 93 [contactID] => 93 [16] => 2018-07-03 15:54:20 [eventUpdated] => 2018-07-03 15:54:20 [17] => 3815_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3815_1200.jpg [18] => 2 [19] => Museum of International Folk Art [instName] => Museum of International Folk Art [20] => 2.jpg [instFileName] => 2.jpg [urlSlug] => alexander-girard-a-d ) [34] => Array ( [0] => 3810 [eventID] => 3810 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Yokai: Ghosts & Demons of Japan [eventTitle] => Yokai: Ghosts & Demons of Japan [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Vivid in Japanese art and imagination are creatures that are at once ghastly and comical. Yokai generally refers to demons, ghosts, shapeshifters, and “strange” and supernatural beings. Specific creatures are commonly associated with classical literature, folklore, theatrical performances, festivals, art, and other forms of expressive culture. Yokai are also prevalent in contemporary Japanese popular culture; you find them in manga (comics), anime (animation), and character-based games such as Pokémon (“pocket monster”).

 

 

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Vivid in Japanese art and imagination are creatures that are at once ghastly and comical. Yokai generally refers to demons, ghosts, shapeshifters, and “strange” and supernatural beings. Specific creatures are commonly associated with classical literature, folklore, theatrical performances, festivals, art, and other forms of expressive culture. Yokai are also prevalent in contemporary Japanese popular culture; you find them in manga (comics), anime (animation), and character-based games such as Pokémon (“pocket monster”).

 

 

[5] =>

Vivid in Japanese art and imagination are creatures that are at once ghastly and comical. Yokai generally refers to demons, ghosts, shapeshifters, and “strange” and supernatural beings. Specific creatures are commonly associated with classical literature, folklore, theatrical performances, festivals, art, and other forms of expressive culture. Yokai are also prevalent in contemporary Japanese popular culture; you find them in manga (comics), anime (animation), and character-based games such as Pokémon (“pocket monster”).

 

The Museum of International Folk Art (MOIFA) is currently planning the exhibition, Yokai: Ghosts & Demons of Japan, which is scheduled to open on November 17, 2019. Narrative arts such as Muromachi Period scroll paintings, Edo Period woodblock prints, and contemporary folk art that depict or involve yokai will illustrate their eerie tales. Ghost and demon characters also appear in classical theatrical performances and special festival events. Contemporary Noh masks and festival costumes and the artists who make them will be a particular exhibition highlight. Toys, games, comic books, and cartoons will connect the past to the present, and the classical to the popular in terms of visual arts and culture. In addition to participatory gallery crafts, the exhibition will include an immersive, family-friendly obake yashiki (a Japanese “ghost house”), a popular form of entertainment in Japanese amusement parks.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Vivid in Japanese art and imagination are creatures that are at once ghastly and comical. Yokai generally refers to demons, ghosts, shapeshifters, and “strange” and supernatural beings. Specific creatures are commonly associated with classical literature, folklore, theatrical performances, festivals, art, and other forms of expressive culture. Yokai are also prevalent in contemporary Japanese popular culture; you find them in manga (comics), anime (animation), and character-based games such as Pokémon (“pocket monster”).

 

The Museum of International Folk Art (MOIFA) is currently planning the exhibition, Yokai: Ghosts & Demons of Japan, which is scheduled to open on November 17, 2019. Narrative arts such as Muromachi Period scroll paintings, Edo Period woodblock prints, and contemporary folk art that depict or involve yokai will illustrate their eerie tales. Ghost and demon characters also appear in classical theatrical performances and special festival events. Contemporary Noh masks and festival costumes and the artists who make them will be a particular exhibition highlight. Toys, games, comic books, and cartoons will connect the past to the present, and the classical to the popular in terms of visual arts and culture. In addition to participatory gallery crafts, the exhibition will include an immersive, family-friendly obake yashiki (a Japanese “ghost house”), a popular form of entertainment in Japanese amusement parks.

[6] => [eventURL] => [7] => 3810_thumb.jpg [eventFileName] => 3810_thumb.jpg [8] => 2019-11-17 [eventStartDate] => 2019-11-17 [9] => 2020-11-15 [eventEndDate] => 2020-11-15 [10] => 00:00:00 [eventStartTime] => 00:00:00 [11] => 00:00:00 [eventEndTime] => 00:00:00 [12] => 1 [recurID] => 1 [13] => 1 [publishID] => 1 [14] => 2 [instID] => 2 [15] => 40 [contactID] => 40 [16] => 2018-05-22 14:23:50 [eventUpdated] => 2018-05-22 14:23:50 [17] => 3810_1200.jpg [eventBanner] => 3810_1200.jpg [18] => 2 [19] => Museum of International Folk Art [instName] => Museum of International Folk Art [20] => 2.jpg [instFileName] => 2.jpg [urlSlug] => yokai-ghosts-demons- ) [35] => Array ( [0] => 2892 [eventID] => 2892 [1] => exhibition [eventType] => exhibition [2] => Dressing with Purpose: Belonging and Resistance in Scandinavia [eventTitle] => Dressing with Purpose: Belonging and Resistance in Scandinavia [3] => [eventSubTitle] => [4] =>

Getting dressed is a creative act, an expression of self and social connection. Getting dressed can also be an artistic performance meant to persuade. Dressing with Purpose examines three dress traditions today—Norwegian bunad, Sami gákti, and Swedish folkdräkt—in light of more than two centuries of social and political change across Scandinavia.

[eventBriefDescription] =>

Getting dressed is a creative act, an expression of self and social connection. Getting dressed can also be an artistic performance meant to persuade. Dressing with Purpose examines three dress traditions today—Norwegian bunad, Sami gákti, and Swedish folkdräkt—in light of more than two centuries of social and political change across Scandinavia.

[5] =>

Starting in the 19th century, many in Sweden worried about the ravages of industrialization, urbanization, and out migration on traditional ways of life. Norway was gripped in a struggle for national independence. Indigenous Sami communities—artificially divided by national borders and long resisting harsh assimilation policies—rose up in protests that sparked cultural renewal. Throughout, people have put on special clothing to communicate powerful messages of unity and opposition, to fight for self-determination, to demonstrate commitment to cherished beliefs. The creative reworking of tradition continues today with dress revivals, reconstructions, and inventions, each meant to fashion a new future.

This exhibition presents historic and newly-made ensembles, jewelry and accessories, alongside the stories of makers and wearers who contemplate enduring questions about belonging, individual rights to shared forms of cultural expression, and most importantly, our responsibilities to each other in the co-creation of community in pluralistic societies.

[eventFullDescription] =>

Starting in the 19th century, many in Sweden worried about the ravages of industrialization, urbanization, and out migration on traditional ways of life. Norway was gripped in a struggle for national independence. Indigenous Sami communities—artificially divided by national borders and long resisting harsh assimilation policies—rose up in protests that sparked cultural renewal. Throughout, people have put on special clothing to communicate powerful messages of unity and opposition, to fight for self-determination, to demonstrate commitment to cherished beliefs. The creative reworking of tradition continues today with dress revivals, reconstructions, and inventions, each meant to fashion a new future.

This exhibition presents historic and newly-made ensembles, jewelry and accessories, alongside the stories of makers and wearers who contemplate enduring questions about belonging, individual rights to shared forms of cultural expression, and most importantly, our responsibilities to each other in the co-creation of community in pluralistic societies.

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Long Term Exhibition
The Buchsbaum Gallery of Southwestern Pottery
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Buchsbaum Gallery features each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona in a selection of pieces that represent the development of a community tradition. In addition, a changing area of the gallery, entitled Traditions Today highlights the evolving contemporary traditions of the ancient art of pottery making.

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Long Term Exhibition
Here, Now and Always
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Here, Now, and Always is a major exhibition based on eight years of collaboration among Native American elders, artists, scholars, teachers, writers and museum professionals. Voices of fifty Native Americans guide visitors through the Southwest’s indigenous communities and their challenging landscapes. More than 1,300 artifacts from the Museum’s collections are displayed accompanied by poetry, story, song and scholarly discussion.

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Long Term Exhibition
Segesser Hide Paintings
New Mexico History Museum

Though the source of the Segesser Hide Paintings is obscure, their significance cannot be clearer: the hides are rare examples of the earliest known depictions of colonial life in the United States. Moreover, the tanned and smoothed hides carry the very faces of men whose descendants live in New Mexico today...

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Long Term Exhibition
Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción
New Mexico History Museum

Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos dating from the late 1700s to 1900 which illustrate the distinctive tradition of santo making in New Mexico introduced by settlers from Mexico.

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Long Term Exhibition
Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now
New Mexico History Museum

Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.

 

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Long Term Exhibition
Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time
New Mexico History Museum
The archaeological and historic roots of America’s oldest capital city

Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital.

Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.

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Long Term Exhibition
Multiple Visions: A Common Bond
Museum of International Folk Art

Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

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Long Term Exhibition
Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy
New Mexico History Museum

Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry.

Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy, a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.

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Long Term Exhibition
New Mexico Colonial Home – Circa 1815
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

The Spanish colonial home (la casa) gives visitors an idea of what a home from the time around 1815 would have looked like.

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Long Term Exhibition
Icons of Exploration
New Mexico Museum of Space History

Showcases some of the Museum’s most celebrated objects including a real "moon rock," rare replicas of the first man-made satellites, Sputnik and Explorer, and the Gargoyle, an early guided missile.

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Long Term Exhibition
The Cowboy Way: Drawings by Robert ’Shoofly’ Shufelt
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

The first artwork ever to be displayed at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum belonged to Robert “Shoofly” Shufelt. Fifteen years after he graciously loaned some of his lithographs for a temporary exhibit, Shufelt and his wife, Julie, donated his collection to the museum for a long-term exhibition.

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Long Term Exhibition
John P. Stapp Air & Space Park
New Mexico Museum of Space History

Named after International Space Hall of Fame Inductee and aeromedical pioneer Dr. John P. Stapp, the Air and Space Park consists of large space-related artifacts documenting mankinds exploration of space.

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Long Term Exhibition
Generations
New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum

The Museum’s first permanent exhibit takes visitors on an odyssey through 150 generations over 4,000 years of agriculture in New Mexico. 

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Mar 5, 2017 - Dec 31, 2018
¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte!
National Hispanic Cultural Center

¡Aquí Estamos: The Heart of Arte! celebrates the NHCC Art Museum’s growing permanent collection with a revitalized vibe and a brand new selection of works. This exhibition was a collaborative project as the entire NHCC Visual Arts staff and interns combed through the collection and worked together to decide which pieces should welcome in 2017. This sampling explores the contributions of these artists and how each work can serve as a reminder of the heart that thrives in strong and resilient communities.

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Mar 12, 2017 - Sep 16, 2018
No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art
Museum of International Folk Art

Tramp art is the product of industry, a style of woodworking from the late 19th and early 20th centuries that made use of discarded cigar boxes and fruit crates that were notched and layered to make a variety of domestic objects.

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Jun 4, 2017 - Jul 29, 2018
Artistic Heritage: Syrian Folk Art
Museum of International Folk Art
on Display in Lloyd’s Treasure Chest

Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest offers a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.

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Aug 27, 2017 - Dec 30, 2018
Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Footwear is evocative. It tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration, reflecting the lives of makers and wearers and offering a window into the past and the present.

This exhibition features sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions; includes Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and exhibited for the first time in decades; and concludes with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses.

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017, and will be on display through the end of 2018.

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Oct 21, 2017 - Oct 1, 2018
Points Through Time
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Projectile points are one of the most iconic images of archaeology in the American Southwest. This exhibition focuses on some of the projectile points that are commonly found here in New Mexico from Paleoindian times (13,500 years ago), through the Archaic, and into Puebloan times (1,260 to 110 years ago) as well as some of the exotic points that have come to New Mexico from California and Texas.

The exhibit discusses how archaeologists classify points, why they change through time, and how illegal collection of points can impact the archaeological record.

This exhibit opens on Saturday October 21, 2017 at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology (7 Old Cochiti Road). After that, the exhibit is open to the public Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on holidays.

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Nov 25, 2017 - Nov 25, 2018
Horizons: People & Place in New Mexican Art
New Mexico Museum of Art

Drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive collection, Horizons shows the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and forms that visual creative expression took here in the 20th century. Featured artists include Robert Henri, Marsden Hartley, John Sloan, Georgia O’Keeffe, Bert Greer Phillips, James Stovall Morris, Victor Higgins, Awa Tsireh, Maria Martinez, Fritz Scholder, Alfred Morang, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, and Gustave Baumann, among many others.

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Nov 25, 2017 - Oct 7, 2018
Shifting Light : Photographic Perspectives
New Mexico Museum of Art

Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Using portraits and oral histories, the show introduces some of the personalities in New Mexico’s twentieth-century photography scene, including Laura Gilpin, Ansel Adams, Thomas Barrow, Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas, among many.

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Dec 3, 2017 - Mar 10, 2019
Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru
Museum of International Folk Art

This exhibition explores the new directions taken by current Peruvian folk artists during the recent decades of social and political upheaval and economic change. The exhibition will highlight the biographies and social histories of contemporary artists along with examples of work that preserve family tradition, reimagine older artforms, reclaim pre-Columbian techniques and styles, and forge new directions for arte popular in the 21st century.

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Dec 10, 2017 - Jul 7, 2019
Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, hunting and horse gear.

These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

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Feb 10, 2018 - Jul 29, 2018
Da Vinci—The Genius Exhibition at New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science
Museum of Natural History and Science

Da Vinci—The Genius opens at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science in Albuquerque at 9am on Saturday, February 10, 2018.  This world class exhibition from Grande Exhibitions remains on display at the Museum daily from 9am-5pm through July 29, 2018.

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Feb 16, 2018 - Nov 11, 2018
La Ultima Exhibición
National Hispanic Cultural Center

La Ultima Exhibición, curated by Augustine Romero, features visual interpretations of Rudolfo Anaya’s celebrated book, Bless Me, Ultima (1972)-a portrait of life in rural New Mexico as seen through the eyes of a young boy during World War II. 

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Mar 2, 2018 - Feb 24, 2019
The Land that Enchants Me So: Picturing Popular Songs of New Mexico
New Mexico History Museum

Before radio and television, when making music at home was the evening’s entertainment and playing the piano was considered an essential talent among the middle class, sheet music was the music consumer’s gateway to the world.”  The New Mexico History Museum celebrates this era with sheet music of popular songs about the State of New Mexico, dating from the mid-19th through the mid-20th centuries, in the new exhibition The Land That Enchants Me So. The show spotlights graphically striking sheet-music covers published from 1840s through about 1960, along with other printed materials, sound recordings, and memorabilia relating to New Mexico and its musical life.

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Apr 8, 2018 - Feb 28, 2019
Maria Samora: Master of Elegance
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
A New Exhibit!

MIAC is happy to announce Maria Samora: Master of Elegance, an exhibition that showcases this year’s Museum of Indian Arts & Culture Living Treasure and Native Treasurers Featured Artist.

Samora (Taos Pueblo) is known for her minimalist lines, interdisciplinary approach, and modern designs.

She began apprenticing with goldsmith and master gem cutter Phil Poirer in 1998 and went on to work with him for 15 years. Since striking out on her own in 2005, her jewelry has become known for the simplicity of its design, textured metals, and combinations of both gold and silver. Stones include traditional turquoise and unexpected choices such as diamonds, guava moonstone, and African opal.

The metalwork Samora has learned to incorporate are rooted in Etruscan, Greek, Egyptian, Syrian, and even Korean designs.

Samora’s work will remain on display in MIAC’s Diker Gallery through February of 2019.

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Apr 22, 2018 - Feb 3, 2019
Beadwork Adorns the World
Museum of International Folk Art

Extraordinary how a small glass bead from the island of Murano (Venice, Italy) or the mountains of Bohemia (Czech Republic) can travel around the world, entering into the cultural life of people far distant. 

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May 25, 2018 - Sep 9, 2018
Frederick Hammersley: To Paint without Thinking
New Mexico Museum of Art

Presented by The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens and the New Mexico Museum of Art

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May 25, 2018 - Sep 9, 2018
Patrick Nagatani: Invented Realities
New Mexico Museum of Art

A Survey across the late artist’s rich career, drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive holdings and concentrating on his creative process and use of visual storytelling.

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Jun 3, 2018 - Apr 7, 2019
What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
A New Exhibit!

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC) periodically features art recently acquired through gifts or purchases. What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection, highlights the collection donated to the Museum by Carol Warren, who was a volunteer in the Collections Department for more than 20 years.

The collection consists of over 200 works of art, including paintings, pottery, jewelry and textiles from some of Santa Fe’s most prominent contemporary artists. A selection of this collection will be on exhibit and will include pieces created by renowned artists such as Tony Abeyta, Tammy Garcia, Dan Namingha, and Jody Naranjo.

The exhibition, co-curated by, C.L. Kieffer Nail, Antonio Chavarria, and Valerie Verzuh, will not only highlight outstanding contemporary artists, but it will also feature multigenerational artists by including work of artists within the same family that have crafted their trade alongside each other.

“By displaying pieces made by related artists, we hope to demonstrate ways in which Native artists inspire each other through instruction as well as how individual artists exhibit their own identity through what is essentially a family practice,” said curator C. L. Kieffer Nail.

In accepting new items, whether they were made yesterday or 12,000 years ago, museum staff consider various issues such as curatorial collecting objectives, gaps in collections, potential future use of the objects such as publication and exhibition, storage limitations and special preservation requirements.

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology collections inspire appreciation for and promote knowledge of the diverse native arts, histories, languages, and cultures of the Greater Southwest. This mission is made possible through the active acquisition of material culture that contributes to an understanding of the peoples that made them.

The creative talents of Native artists in the past, present and future, give purpose to the MIAC. This is why it continues to collect and preserve art and artifacts made by tribal artists from all time periods. It endeavors to educate visitors about ancient yet living Native cultures, and provide Indian artists with examples of their ancestors’ gifts.

The accessioned collections of the museum are made possible by the generosity of donors and the cultivation of such by the Museum of New Mexico Foundation and its affiliated support groups.

 

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Jun 3, 2018 - May 31, 2019
Atomic Histories
New Mexico History Museum
Remembering New Mexico’s Nuclear Past

The Atomic Histories exhibit explores the most famous events, sometimes little known stories, and inventions born here which impact our lives, and helps to recognize the remarkable contributions of thousands of people involved in writing New Mexico’s Atomic Histories for the last 75 years. 

Curated by Melanie LaBorwit, Educator with the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors.

Photo courtesy of the Los Alamos Historical Society Archives 

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Oct 20, 2018 - Jan 19, 2019
2018 NatureScapes Annual Photo Contest Topic: Clouds
Museum of Natural History and Science

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science (NMMNHS)  2018 NatureScapes Annual Photo competition – Clouds.

Photographs are submitted to the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science through the month August 2018.         

 

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Dec 16, 2018 - Aug 25, 2019
A Gathering of Voices: Folk Art from the Judith Espinar and Tom Dillenberg Collection
Museum of International Folk Art

A Gathering of Voices celebrates the promised gift of the folk art collection of Judith Espinar and Tom Dillenberg. Comprising primarily ceramic traditions from Mexico, Spain, France, Hungary, Morocco, and numerous other countries, the collection also includes rich holdings of New Mexico santos, Latin American retablos, and metalwork, furniture and textiles from around the world. The exhibition brings together the various voices of international cultures and living traditions, through the vision of one collector.

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May 5, 2019 - Oct 27, 2019
Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe
Museum of International Folk Art

Alexander Girard was one of the most influential interior and textile designers of the 20th century. Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe is the first major retrospective on Girard’s work, organized by the Vitra Design Museum in Germany. It opens a door to his creative universe and shows his close relationships with contemporaries such as Charles & Ray Eames, Eero Saarinen, Andy Warhol, Rudi Gernreich, and many others. Featured are Girard’s designs in textiles, furniture, and sculptures, as well as numerous sketches, drawings, and collages never shown before.

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Nov 17, 2019 - Nov 15, 2020
Yokai: Ghosts & Demons of Japan
Museum of International Folk Art

Vivid in Japanese art and imagination are creatures that are at once ghastly and comical. Yokai generally refers to demons, ghosts, shapeshifters, and “strange” and supernatural beings. Specific creatures are commonly associated with classical literature, folklore, theatrical performances, festivals, art, and other forms of expressive culture. Yokai are also prevalent in contemporary Japanese popular culture; you find them in manga (comics), anime (animation), and character-based games such as Pokémon (“pocket monster”).

 

 

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Jan 5, 2020 - Jan 17, 2021
Dressing with Purpose: Belonging and Resistance in Scandinavia
Museum of International Folk Art

Getting dressed is a creative act, an expression of self and social connection. Getting dressed can also be an artistic performance meant to persuade. Dressing with Purpose examines three dress traditions today—Norwegian bunad, Sami gákti, and Swedish folkdräkt—in light of more than two centuries of social and political change across Scandinavia.

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